Wrestled Alligators Professionally, Fought Fires, Delivered Babies, Saved Lives, Built and Sold Companies (FAILED and PIVOTED more than most), Worked with Sharks (means Venture Capitalists), was one of the first to build an online group fitness company, Built and Scaled a network of co-working studios in partnerships with local municipalities, built and sold podcasts and media brands, Interviewed over 400 Entrepreneurs and CEO across 5 Podcast Shows reaching the top of iTunes Charts.

Josh is a man of faith who is lovingly devoted to his family and lifts up humanity with kindness and brings peace to chaos. His philosophy is “Belief systems shape our values, which guide our principles, that drives our actions.”

 

Watch the episode here:

 

Listen to the podcast here:

 

Kingdom CRE Syndicate Investing with Josh Wilson

 

Brett:

I’m excited about our next guest. He is out of the great state of Florida, and he’s wrestled alligators professionally fought fires delivered babies save lives built and sold companies, and he has failed and pivoted more than most. He’s worked with sharks, and by that, he means venture capitalist. It was one of the first to build an online group fitness company. He built and scaled a network and co-working studios in partnership with local most municipalities, and he built and sold podcasts and media brands, all kinds of stuff and so much more, and we’re gonna be talking real estate branding. becoming an entrepreneur. Please welcome to the show with me, Josh Wilson. Josh, how are you doing?

Josh:

Brett. Good to see you. Thanks for having me.

Brett:

For listeners getting to know you for the first time. Would you give us a little bit more about your background and your current focus?

Josh:

I’m in the process of writing a book right now. It’s called Josh The Failure. I’ve failed and pivoted more than most and that kind of is a part of my story. I’ve lost all my money multiple times. It seems like I lost all my money around an anytime I had a kid I have three kids, I’ve, I’ve had about three financial collapses in my life, and I just kind of share the story of entrepreneurship. We had a bunch of podcast shows and media brands in our network, and, I believe that there’s a story behind the dealmaker and the most important investment is obviously in yourself but also in the relationships that you build. Those are the kinds of things that I like to talk about on my shows and through my brokerage and through the deals that I do.

Brett:

Fantastic and for listeners also getting to know you for the first time you see I believe even me, I’m still getting to know you. I was on your podcast, which was a lot of fun, by the way, and we almost in person when I went to Jacksonville a few weeks ago, but are the lines don’t quite line up. But I want you to go back to your high school days. Your earlier days, younger Josh? I believe we’ve all been given certain gifts in this life, and these gifts have been given to us to be a blessing and help to others. Some people call it a strength some people call them superpowers. I’m curious, what are those one or two gifts that you believe you were given? And has that helped you help and bless people today?

Josh:

Great question, Brett. I moved to Ocala from Fort Lauderdale, which is, near the beaches and near Miami, and the hustle-bustle of kind of bigger city and I moved to Ocala, which is a small horse country and it was very interesting, I moved as a freshman in high school. I moved to this place, I didn’t know anybody I were, board shorts, flip flops, and so shirt, and I was in a high school with a bunch of cowboys, and with a bunch of, big, jacked-up pickup trucks and stuff like that, and to be honest, I did not fit. But one of the superpowers that I think God blessed me with, is the ability to, fit in any group. Throughout my time I got as a small guy, but I found my place on the wrestling mat, and I don’t like talking about this, because it’s kind of like, I don’t want to be ego, but like, I made a lot of friends I wound up becoming they designated me the most popular kid in the school. Not growing up here knowing nobody to be most popular.

Now that’s as a teenager, that’s cool because you can meet a lot of people have a lot of fun, and people like that, but fast forward what, what that parlays into business, and after a little bit of maturity and a lot of failures is knowing the ability to connect people and that knowing the ability to put deals together and in see people for their value, and parlaying into different groups, whether it’s an investment group over here, an entrepreneurial group over here, or maybe a group that nobody’s paying attention to over here. I think that’s how I bless people is by seeing them and then finding out what they need.

Brett:

I love that. It’s like whatever. Like your wife wants you to say. I hear you and I see something I try to practice say she is telling me something and I gotta digest a little bit it’s not as she says it to me too. She’s like, I hear you and I see so if I’m hearing you, Josh is saying you can hear and connect with people in an authentic way and make friends quickly. Is that a fair summary so far?

Josh:

I’ve never met a stranger it just like I said, there’s probably some skill set level in here but I think it’s the way that God wired me together. He’s like Josh is going to be extremely extroverted. He’s never met a stranger everyone from billionaires I’ve, friends that billionaires to the homeless people, everyone. I just love a lot of people, and that happens so that I love deals in the business. It makes connecting and syndication fun. It’s fantastic.

Brett:

That’s where we’re talking about Kingdom commercial real estate syndications or syndicate investing right now. Josh, what’s the best-kept secret to commercial real estate syndications or syndicates the way that, and how would you define that? Because I don’t want to put that in a box. It could be a brokerage, it could be networked, it could be brand. Find that for us, and then we’ll also get to the commercial real estate side of things.

Josh:

When I started in real estate, I grew up on a construction site with my dad. Swinging hammers, and working in the summers, I was the cheap labor. My dad gave me a posthole digger, I got my Ph.D., and I learned how to dig footers and swing hammers, and it was a tough job, and, and I remember, at a young age, I just felt like my mission was to, help my dad help, everybody has daddy, mommy issues, and one of my things was I wanted to make my dad proud. But I also wanted to help his business, I read a bunch of business books as a young kid. But, I saw these people I’m working, for an hourly wage in the Florida Sun, floating trusses, or roofing, and then Alexis would drive up. They’d put a sign in the front yard and drive off, and they were making more money than me. I said, Who are they? What are they doing, I found out, they’re in real estate, they’re selling what all the hard work that we did.

At a young age, I got my real estate license, and I found that, especially in Central Florida, there’s, you could have a million-dollar house next to a mobile home, there are some interesting, areas, and I just found that I didn’t really work well, with the residential world, listing a home for, Grandma Suzy, and then showing it to 100 people and then getting, a $300 commission check wasn’t for me. I started working with investors, and this is where I learned a little bit about what it means to be a syndicator what it means to be a networker connector, as a lot of times, I would go in, I would get my own deals, and then I would syndicate the deal out. I’d find a deal, I’d lock it up, and then I would wind up selling the deal to an investor or an investment group, and I just found that it was so much easier and fun, more fun to work with a group that was buying 10 to 20 properties a year, rather than, this churn and burn of trying to list the property and, maybe spend all my time to get a deal, and then one deal 300 bucks, I’d rather do 10 at a time. I guess that’s kind of how I got into real estate.

Brett:

Let me connect the dots here. You’re on the job site. By the way, I had a similar story. I grew up in the Bay Area, my dad Custom Homes, room additions, I was the guy we were my brother and I were the guys who moved the bricks or move the boards. Hammer did random nails, or whatever he’d say, Whatever you do, don’t move bricks twice, like, make sure you have a plan a process for what you’re doing, and drywall and Ryan, my brother’s driving the bobcat, and he’s like, tipping overside. He was like, tip the whole thing over on a big ditch, he was digging. But you’re sitting there and you’re like, wait, we’ve been working like 8, 9, 10 hour days. That person just drove up for a few minutes, put a sign out front. How much are they making? You’re going A and then B, C real estate, and then you also looked around said, wait, there’s also people putting these commercial real estate deals together? How much are they making? In other words, you’re connecting the dots, and you’re bringing people together to make sense of it? Is that a fair summary so far?

Josh:

In a deal, there’s a lot of people that play in the deal, and what I found is, I’m not a good manager. I’m not, I don’t have the highest attention to detail. I am an extremely good networker and strategist when it comes to people in groups and what people are looking for. I found my fit. In real estate, it was investors and, an opportunity and that parlayed into, spec houses, not a good time to do it in 2006. But, we built a bunch of houses, connecting the dots between investor and, builder and landowner, and we put that whole process together, and we did pretty cool things by connecting the dots, and I stayed in my sweet spot, which was the connecting piece between all of them That was before I even knew what syndicating was, like, I was valet parking a car one time and, and I wound up introducing an investor to one of the projects that I was working on, so it’s just putting people together is my superpower, and I love it. I gotta get out of the deal as quick as possible. There are people better at it than me.

Brett:

I love it. No, it’s understanding your role, knowing your role. I also think of the movie Office Space. Where they call the manager and they’re like, they’re doing the reviews and so what would you say you do here he goes. I’m a people person. Well, what does that mean? I deal to people and so so would you walk us through a day-to-day thing? You’re like, the TPS report I saw you physically take the TPS report to the customer. Well, sometimes, and of course, that’s, it’s a hilarious movie you’ve ever seen it. But you can’t overstate the ability to connect with people. We connected about a month, a month ago, on a podcast here in Florida, I’m in California, and the ability to raise capital to develop relationships that know like and trust without having those, and then also finding each person the operator, the person maybe is good working with the brokers, for some good working with the investor relations, the person who doesn’t ever want to talk to anybody, they’re not a people person to the person doing the TPS report in the background. I think that’s really wise. Tell me, what was the hardest thing about getting it out of your own way, as an entrepreneur and figuring that out?

Josh:

I think knowing who you are, I think that is the hardest part. Because you go through school, I get my bachelor’s degree, and I go to business school, and they said, these are the things you must be, and I’m looking at all these things, and it’s got to be good at finance, and I got to be good at management at property manager, and then I got to be good at, putting together the spreadsheet, and then the marketing stuff, and I got overwhelmed. I think the hardest part about getting into something is knowing your place and owning it, and then building, finding the best value output and who needs it. I asked myself five questions, or when I’m coaching a group, or someone’s asking me to put together a deal or connect them with capital or connect them with, opportunity. It’s, who am I? Who do I serve? What do I do for them? Why do I do it? There’s one other question, but I won’t bring that one into it. But I think that’s the hardest part is kind of knowing who you are, is I think a lot of people don’t spend the time trying to figure that out.

Brett:

I think it’s so true. It reminds me of the book Rich Dad Poor Dad and or just the traditional educational systems. Where we are taught to, like, we need to get all the grades and all of the subjects, even if we load the subjects, or they’re just, they’re just not very good at right. Like I wasn’t great at, Spanish, I could speak it. But I was like, terrible, like trying to, dictate and go through, and I was I had a love and passion for history and math, and like, not so much for science. That’s just wasn’t the way I was kind of wired. But I think, knowing your place, knowing where you’re at, is it there’s a, there’s a formula that I’ve been, that I’ve been meditating on. It has to do with the fact that once you understand your strengths. Remember the God-given strengths you’ve been given or superpowers or strength you believe you have timed the maximizing the potential of that. Not just knowing your strengths, but then actually maximizing and working on those like a laser focus on with the laser to maximize them, then the third thing is making an impact for people, and then the bigger purpose is like, making a bigger impact that we’re here for something more than just today or tomorrow, or just our lifetime. Belief. For me, it’s God and belief in a higher power. Could you connect those two words of knowing your strengths? Then what do you do to maximize the potential there? Then also talk about how your branding and building to help more people?

Josh:

But that’s a good question. It’s easy. I feel a podcast shows sold one that in the past, I’ve been doing this for a long time. I’ve had maybe 700 interviews in the past. I’m always a lot more comfortable when I’m asking questions. If you see me moving around a little bit, then I’m nervous to be honest, like most of the time, I’m in the control seat where I’m interviewing other people. But, the question you asked is like, how do I maximize my God-given talents? Like, in the Bible, in the good book, it talks about, the master, he gives five talents to this person, three to this person and one to this person, and the way that I’m doubling in that I go, all in on my talent is, we invest in relationships. We have three podcast shows, I’m looking at my board, we have three podcast shows, currently in production, looking at investing in a few others right now and a few other influencers to build out relationships and deal flow. We’re gonna do 500 interviews by August 22 to 2022. We’re pumping out two to three pieces of content every single day with influencers and interviews with dealmakers, and then we have our impact show.

I am, I’m all in on, on relationships. I think that’s how I’m diving in on the impact side. Some of the things that we do are we have a donor-advised fund that we set aside some money to help support military police and fire frontline workers and their families. We have what we call a Fergie Fund. We’re raising what we set aside some money out raise it. But we’re setting aside some money for the Family Readiness Group for my partner’s wife who flies Blackhawks for the military. We’re, like, that’s our impact side of things, and we have an impact show where we focus on men. It’s called Uncensored Advice For Men. From porn stars to pastors, we asked tough questions and kind of reported back and then device. I’m all in on relationships and conversations with people.

Brett:

Fantastic, by the way, can learn more about Josh Wilson and his three podcasts and 500 episodes gonna be delivered by August of next year gonna hold you to that KingdomSyndicate.com, that’s KingdomSyndicat.com. I think that’s really, really neat, fascinating, and cool. And I think the thing that I pulled out of that was the fact that you cleared your complete time schedule like you just said, you know what? I to do 500 interviews by August on 3 different shows. Obviously, you got to be in front of the camera, you got to be on the mic, you got to be in the zoom, you’re in the first time in this restream room. For those who are not watching it on YouTube, he’s got his green, he got his green in the back, but restream come on, pick up your game restream they don’t allow the green screen in the back. But that’s really amazing. You said look, I’m just going to burn the ships on everything else in a sense. Well, mostly everything else on my time and energy and my on focus on other things and just builds relationships with the podcast. Is that a fair summary?

 

Kingdom CRE Syndicate Investing with Josh Wilson

Kingdom CRE Syndicate Investing: “The hardest part about getting into something is knowing your place and owning it, and then building, finding the best value output and who needs it.” – Josh Wilson

 

Josh:

Everything is built around people. With COVID happening last year. What happened is the face-to-face networkers the face-to-face dealmakers and, and that world kind of went away fast, and, everybody’s, scrambling to kind of figure it out. But people who have been building up their podcast brands and with their online, positioning like you, Brett, like, we’re a little bit ahead of the game. We know how to build relationships with people virtually, we get to share that and people are consuming content at a higher rate because they don’t have the major commute to work. Maybe they’re working from home, and people are looking, to look outside of their corporate job because companies are shutting down or they’re moving or they’re changing their policies. We have to be flexible, content powerful relationships and conversations are powerful, and if we learn from other people, it’s called wisdom. That’s why the shows are important.

Brett:

Beautiful, love it. Let’s talk about some commercial real estate syndications. Maybe you can tell us about either live deal or recently past deal, and what does it look like where you buy in while you’re buying? What was the story? What was the value add play?

Josh:

This is going to be some we’re probably not like a lot of syndicators. We, we help put deals together for other people and we try to get out as quickly as possible and set up a referral relationship or agreement. One of our partners, their, their partner of our, our podcast and our brand and some of the things that we’re doing, we’ve sent in $18 million worth of deals, so they do commercial real estate financing. To our podcast shows through the guests that we’ve interviewed through the network we’ve sent in three months sent an $18 million worth of deals, not all of them work clothes, but that’s like we became their outsourced or fractional, business development company, we have another company, this is not real estate related. I play a major piece in commercial real estate because it’s a great investment asset, and we don’t want to get in residential because I don’t care if the color of the house is blue or red or whatever, it doesn’t make money. That’s why we like working with investors. But we also do this in business brokering and business investments. We work with investment groups that are looking to find deal flow and such so we have a group that we raise capital with, they set up this structure this vehicle, and we’ve become their top salesperson through our podcast show. They love us and we’re opening up things and maybe even raising a fund ourselves to buy some tech companies and such like that but awesome.

Brett:

I said I take this stuff so it’s referring to introducing and bringing the relationship and your necessary operations on the ground. You’re sticking to your strengths. Because a lot of people are preaching on the ground, they don’t have the podcast or the connections or the outreach or the technology or all of that they’re focused on hammering the nail in clear and clearing the landfill entitlements to get the ground broken on the deal.

Josh:

Good on them go for it like if they’re really great operators like we work with some mobile home park investors, like go for it, if you like doing self-storage or mobile home parks or manufacturing distribution, that’s great. Everyone needs investment everyone needs capital. Not everybody knows how to smile and dial or jump on a call to present the deal. Not everybody can do that. Not everybody has a connection. Know your lane, have fun in it, own it, and keep learning to try to get better at it. Because this I mean, this is someone that said the other day they go. Josh, you’re really good at this one little sliver. I go that’s all I’m good at this one little piece.

Brett:

All right, let’s talk about the Deferred Sales Trust. I came on your show, and so my the premise that I really believe in the Deferred Sales Trust, we believe it’s the number one way to raise capital for business ventures or commercial real estate syndications. All tax-deferred. Especially for ultra-high net worth individuals who are selling and especially with the demographics and the baby boomers who are selling and looking to retire and be a little more passive. Aren’t necessarily as excited about the stock market, per se, and so you can sell deferring works for cryptocurrency, too. That’s also a thing like cryptocurrency folks are excited about real estate typically, or at least likes and real estate, that not as excited about the stock market. What is your take so far on the Deferred Sales Trust as a way to defer capital gains tax, and then be able to fund opportunities?

Josh:

There’s this thing called the Seller Tsunami. You call it the Silver Tsunami when you came on my show? Brilliant, by the way, so there’s going to be the largest transfer of wealth that has already been initiated from the baby boomers that came back, from World War Two, and they started building businesses. All these really incredible things are actually they came back had babies, and those baby boomers are building business, those businesses, what’s happening with those, all of that wealth, all of those things, what is happening with that. A lot of people are holding on to their business because they’re looking at the local administration, they’re looking at, tax consequences. Now, their job is a part of their identity. They’re holding on. The DST, from my understanding of it, is such a great way where they can still have that transfer of wealth, and maybe their kid, isn’t suited to run their business, but so they can have an exit event, and then maybe explore some other things, or maybe invest in their kids, using this, I think that it’s a really interesting tool that we’re trying to add that to our tool belt of opportunities, because a lot of people, one of their fears of selling, and one of our partners is, very large M&A Group, like, this is now a new tool that we could bring in for sellers, who do want to move on and do something else with their life, invest this money into charity, or a business or something that they’re passionate about. I think it’s pretty cool, especially with the silver tsunami, which I learned that from you.

Brett:

Thanks so much, and we couldn’t agree more, and that’s part of why we call this part of the segment, the show the biggest frustration is capital gains tax from the 1031 Exchange. Like, there are different tools to fit different time periods in different generations and different needs and guess what I always call 1031, when it’s like the hammer, and the hammer can work for a long time. But sometimes, Josh, you’re on the job site and you need that screwdriver, I need something a little more, it’s going to do a different thing in a different way. I could call the Deferred Sales Trust a Swiss army knife. Because you can’t really put it in a box that works for any asset that you’re selling. It can save a field 1031 Exchange, it works for general partners getting out of syndication, you can reinvest the funds into another syndication, you can put it into stocks, bonds, mutual funds, you can do ground-up development, you can work for cryptocurrency, so there are so many aspects to this. The question is for the listener, like, what are you trying to accomplish? Then just figure out which tool is going to help get you there, and sometimes we’re doing like a partial 1031, partial Deferred Sales Trust even a partial Delaware Statutory Trust, a nor partial opportunity’s own. Don’t put yourself in a box, figure out what you’re trying to accomplish, and then go there any thoughts on that, Josh?

Josh:

You’re a sharp guy. That you’re a sharp guy, you’ve really captured this niche. You really own this space. Like, you’re really good. 

Brett:

You’re too kind, we’re on a mission to help a lot of people. We saw a lot of pain and 08, people that overpaid, and I saw I literally went with a guy and 06. He told me to sell because the market was so high, he had $50 million of apartment complexes. He had a lot of debt. He was doing all these 1031 live in this huge, like $2 million mansions, all these cars, and let’s just say he was spending too much, but he had too much debt. We told him to sell, he didn’t sell he lost, everything went bankrupt. But part of that we went back and we talked to him, he said, it’s because I didn’t want to pay the Capital Gains Tax, and I felt like I had to, I had to chase the next deal, and this is where the Deferred Sales Trust can really alleviate that, that pressure and give you time flexibility.it’s because of the pain, Josh that I have the passion. I think that’s part of life. I imagine part of your passion for what you do, is because of some of the pain and challenges you had to overcome. What was what’s been the single biggest thing that you’ve had to overcome to become where you’re at today?

Josh:

In the story, there’s a lot of failures. It’s, and a lot of it is a lack of competence, or lack of self-worth, or identity issues. There’s a lot of things I think the hardest thing is it’s a mental game. It’s like, I am my own worst enemy. I think that that is one of the hardest things that I struggle with and that I have struggled with is this identity piece, and I talk about it a lot when I coach a younger guy, or maybe a little less experienced person is the identity piece is so important. Because once you kind of start working those in and focusing on your strengths, and then, not being afraid to talk about your weaknesses, and not being afraid to ask for help, or bring someone in, I think four the most entrepreneurs are a little wired, like me who are hard drivers that are, an outward appearance of, ego and confidence. But inside, we’re just we’re trying to prove something to others, and we’re trying to find our fit. I think if the hardest thing to do, for entrepreneurs, and then this just being real is like, it’s just finding our lane really believing in what our mission is and diving into it.

Brett:

Beautiful, Josh, thanks so much for sharing. That being said, we’re running out of time. Are you ready for the lightning round?

Josh:

God makes me nervous. Sure. 

Brett:

All right. Know what you know now, if you go back to your 25-year-old self, what’s the one golden nugget, make sure to tell yourself to do?

Josh:

25-year-old self, I would say you got to chase, you got to go with your gut on where you think God’s calling you, and you got to go down that path. Because I took a bunch of different windy paths to get me to the place. If you would ask me at 18 what my goals in life are, I would have been doing what I’m doing now. But I had to because I didn’t trust my gut. I trust other people who weren’t necessarily bought into who I was, they were just trying to fit me into an educational piece of go to school, get your degree go work at a corporation or the government for 30 years get out. That’s not neat. I would say trust your gut to know who you are, dive in trust God that he’s gonna walk you through it.

Brett:

This is part of the Rich Dad Poor Dad a part of the lightning round. Out of that Robert Kiyosaki his amazing book. What’s the number one thing that you try to implement in your business and your life with that book?

Josh:

I keep on looking at my daily mission, my daily tasks, and I’m looking at the ESBI quadrants, like, where did these activities, where will they land me? If I’m looking at this stuff, I’m going this is an employee task. This is a self-employed TAs. I need to be focusing on building assets and building the business. That’s where I am constantly trying to push myself to be on side of the quadrants.

Brett:

Next question, what are you most curious about right now?

Josh:

Good question, was curious about it? There’s, I think capital raising for equities, equity pieces. We’re working with local legislation, as well, for the state of Florida, and for some investment groups and such who are asking me to go knock on doors for capital. I think the most interesting thing is how do I do it in a way that it’s clear cut in the guidelines, but how do I be the best at it? How do I be the best, capital formation person that this world’s ever seen? I think I’m most curious about how the movement of money.

Brett:

Last question, after all your success, and all the podcasts and all the people and raising all the capital, and everything you’ve accomplished, how do you stay centered in your values? How do you stay encouraged charged to reach new heights?

Josh:

I stay centered. I mean, I got tattoos that remind me, I got tattoos and scars that remind me of my mission and my past mistakes. I think those are good. I think my wife’s really quick to remind me of the past failures, and I think that, in our humble position of we’ve, we’ve been bankrupt, I’ve been on food stamps. I’ve, I’ve worked in venture capital one day, and, was, selling roofs door to door, the next I’ve worked at moving companies to put, diapers on my babies, but so it’s like, I hit highs, I’ve hit lows, and I think the most important thing, no matter where I’m at, if I can believe that God has me here for a purpose, and I’m here to help and bless people, then I think that’s how I get centered. Because this man that you and I both know, extremely wealthy people and, and they have very similar problems that may just different, I think being centered is if we all walked into a room and threw our problems on the table, and our problems and our blessings would probably want to scoop up our own problems and blessings and walk out of the room with them. I think being just transparent with people not posturing and just going. I’ve been there, I’ve hit rock bottom, and I thought about Swan Diving off a bridge because of it, but that doesn’t make me who I am. I didn’t and I move forward, and that’s what I’m trying. I’m working hard.

Brett:

Josh Wilson, thank you so much for sharing, and thank you for being on the show, and thank you for being an entrepreneur chasing your dreams, pushing through all the challenges I want to encourage you to keep using the gift of connecting and making friends I think you’ve definitely made a friend of me and I imagined our listeners too are thinking, I like this Josh I just like the shark guy and you should and you should find him by the way, at a place called KingdomSyndicate.com it’s Kingdomsyndicate.com. Josh Wilson, thanks for being on the show, and also want to thank our listeners for listening to the episode of the capital gains tax wishes podcast. As always, we believe most high net worth individuals and those who helped them they struggled clarifying their Capital Gains Tax Deferral Options not having a clear plan is the enemy, and using a proven tactical show such as the Deferred Sales Trust is a great way to defer your capital gains tax cryptocurrency business primary home so you can create and preserve more wealth or help your clients do the same you can go to CapitalGainsTaxSolutions.com. That’s CapitalGainsTaxSolutions.com to learn all about that, and you can also check this out on eXpert CRE Secrets where we are helping commercial real estate brokers level up their business you can also go and learn more about that eXpertCRESecrets.com. Thanks to everyone for listening and watching and please Rate, Review and Subscribe.

 

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About Josh Wilson

 

Kingdom CRE Syndicate Investing with Josh WilsonWrestled Alligators Professionally, Fought Fires, Delivered Babies, Saved Lives, Built and Sold Companies (FAILED and PIVOTED more than most), Worked with Sharks (means Venture Capitalists), was one of the first to build an online group fitness company, Built and Scaled a network of co-working studios in partnerships with local municipalities, built and sold podcasts and media brands, Interviewed over 400 Entrepreneurs and CEO across 5 Podcast Shows reaching the top of iTunes Charts.

Josh is a man of faith who is lovingly devoted to his family and lifts up humanity with kindness and brings peace to chaos. His philosophy is “Belief systems shape our values, which guide our principles, that drives our actions.”

 

 

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