“It’s about being relatable to other people staying humble and staying, being able to connect with other people.” Kenneth Ameduri is the chief editor and co-founder of the financial publication letter CrushTheStreet.com. He was a founder of Future Money Trends and Wealth Research Group, which has gone on to be a vital source of education and wealth for hundreds of thousands of readers. In his 20s, Kenneth has founded multiple businesses that have gone on to be worth millions of dollars. Kenneth was also a founder of FMT Advisory, which successfully manages millions of dollars in client funds. He is an ardent student of Austrian economics and anticipating market trends as he has successfully invested and built companies for more than 15 years. Kenneth spends his time relentlessly analyzing resources, tech, and other sectors, uncovering areas in which equity can be captured and a profit can be made. Kenneth is passionate about sharing the lessons of success and failure that have led him to where he is today through his work published weekly at CrushTheStreet.com.

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Crushing the Street with Kenneth Ameduri – Crypto Currency Real Estate and Precious Medals

Brett:

I’m excited about our next guest. He has a nice diversified background of real estate ownership of cryptocurrency as well as precious metals. And so kind of more of an alternative way of looking at building wealth. In fact, you can find him crushthestreet.com. He’s originally from California and decided to move to the great state of Texas. And I’m excited to welcome Keneth Ameduri to the show can’t tell you doing,

Kenneth:

Brett, I’m doing well. Thanks for having me on the show. It’s a pleasure to be here and talk about money and just entrepreneurship, finance growth. I mean, all these things are just so exciting to me, especially in this world we’re living in right now. It’s kind of a crazy time, right?

Brett:

Absolutely. You know, the world’s kind of been turned upside down a lot of ways of COVID-19 and kind of a new era here. And we’ll see how it all shakes out political tension, a lot, a lot of changes going on. That being said, let’s dive straight into a little bit about your story. And curious, tell us a little bit about your background and your current focus.

Kenneth:

Well, as you said, I moved here to Texas from California, and a lot of it had to do with taxes. It is what it is, you know, I’m not looking to do anything illegal, I always agree to pay my taxes and abide by the law. But legally, I’m allowed to live in Texas and pay fewer taxes. So capital is going to go where it’s treated best, right? The weather’s not as good, though, but that is what it is. But yeah, going back to my story, I mean, I could just think back to the time I was a kid, you know, hearing the stories of my mom, my dad, my mom was from Argentina, actually, she was an immigrant to the US. And she is someone that her parents from Europe, they were living in Italy at the time, obviously, after World War Two, Europe was decimated, I mean, completely, just not a great place to live. And a lot of people were moving to a place that, you know, had a good economy, had people going there that spoke the same language that you know, similar cultures and whatnot in Argentina was a popular spot for a lot of Europeans to go as the economy was great for like a minute, right? You know, you hear all the problems that are going on there now, but at the time, it was actually pretty good, you know. And so they kind of ruined that the government did a lot of capital controls. I mean, they saw hyperinflation, and luckily my mom and my mom’s parents and her how to store because what’s an interesting thing is that, you know, they weren’t, they weren’t necessarily dependent on a fixed paycheck. Like a lot of people are in inflationary environments, they were actually able to raise prices when the prices went up, or when their currency went down, I should say, which is just an interesting thing. I mean, they really start here in the US we don’t necessarily have we’ve never really experienced crazy inflation the way some of these other countries have. But that was really in my mom, from you know, this distrust perspective. My grandfather died with cash underneath his mattress, you know, that’s how much he just trusted banks, you know, banking controls, and then devaluing the currency. So anyway, I really instilled this individualism, you know, don’t depend on you know, the government or just, you know, something else to really take care of you. I mean, you know, obviously love people and Have community and whatnot but I mean really take initiative in your life and go out and do something. So anyway, that really stirred up entrepreneurship in me. I mean, my father was always planting seeds of just Hey, you know, how could we make our first million dollars and you know, don’t expect somebody to just go out and make it big or you know, working from somebody else to be your ticket to financial freedom truly, financial freedom comes from having ownership of your life and, you know, ownership over your, your income is a big part of that. So that’s where what led me to want to invest. I mean, I was really my goal has always been it still is I love investing in real estate, the idea of paying off a house, you know, I, I like the idea of paying off a house and just the cash flow it brings, you know, the peace of mind, not being overly leftover should it and whatnot, and I get off that, but just I cannot think of a safer, more needed thing in this world in real estate and just having that peace of mind. And so everything I do is just like guerrilla warfare to just buy real estate, you know, own precious metals owned some safe stocks, you know, and that was even the business that I started to get into, you know, we covered the economy, we cover finance, we cover stocks, what’s going on around the world? What are humans doing? Where is capital going to go to be invested in different trends to be in front of those trends, you know, before they’re fully appreciated by the market and efficiently priced, effectively priced? So anyway, that’s what we do to crush the street. You know, we partner with different companies, we do try to do them at the right time where we get into them and experience the move higher. And, you know, I’m an investor. That’s what I do. That’s why I love educating people.

Brett:

Yeah, I love it great. What an amazing story, what amazing heritage and, and, and, like so many who came from the really tough era of world war two to set that legacy for the family and, and then entrepreneurship, right. And then and then that, that, that, I guess that thirst and that appreciation for freedom, right, the opportunity to do what we’ve had a chance to do, let’s see our generation not having to think about a lot of the challenges they had, right. As far as you know, parents and grandparents, grandparents, especially So I love that story. I especially love the part of your dad like, Hey, how are we gonna make our first million right? You know, I’ve watched a comedian Sebastian Maniscalco. He’s seen him. And he talks about his dad, like, one Saturday, he was like an eight-year-old, right? And he was, you know, he’s just watching cartoons. Saturday morning, everything was going pretty well. He thought, you know, and then all of a sudden, his dad says, Hey, turn off the TV and go start a business. And he’s like, What do you mean? He’s, like, yeah, go start a business. And he’s like, he’s like, pushing him outside, you know? And he’s like, oh, right now, like I suppose my wife is starting right now. And he’s like, yeah, my dad instilled that at his early age to have like, be like an entrepreneur and taking that individual responsibility. So love that.

Kenneth:

It’s hard. I’m just gonna say it’s hard to be an entrepreneur, I mean, you know, some of the things you start to realize you got to be a salesperson, now, it’s not just, oh, I’m gonna be technical and do some, like, now you got to sell. And now you have to deal with people. I mean, I started my business, you know, in my early 20s. And there were a lot of things about, you know, just interacting with the CEOs at a high level who’ve been in business for 20 years, they’ve had a lot of like, mental conditioning. And, and, like, I guess, just negotiating, I don’t know, expertise that I just didn’t have, at the time, I didn’t have a depth of, you know, social interactions of, you know, meeting people at conferences, and just a lot of the things that you really need to kind of get and get comfortable with, and presenting yourself and dealing with these situations. I mean, I was just, you know, so much about the investment, but then all of a sudden, oh, there’s all this, like, this is a world of, of knowing that I’m just not familiar with. And those are those that were struggling, it was a struggle too, like, get up to par and to feel, you know, okay, I can do this, you know. And so it was part of the growing process of being in business and just getting thrown out, because I never really had a real job if you will, you know if that makes sense. I mean, I had a minimum wage job. And I went into business investing and, you know, running, learning what I do, so that was part of my struggle. I know you can ask about that. But that was part of it.

Crushing the Street with Kenneth Ameduri - CryptoCurrency, Real Estate, and Precious Medals

Crushing the Street with Kenneth Ameduri – CryptoCurrency, Real Estate, and Precious Medals – “Only buy something that you’d be perfectly happy to hold if the market shuts down for ten years.” – Warren Buffett

 

Brett:

That’s beautiful. I know, picture sharing, that’s great context. into that point. I’m curious, you give us the background about the family and such, and, and the heritage, which is amazing. What is, I think, although I think we all have been given certain gifts in this life, you know, and these gifts are used to be able to bless others and part of who we are. So I want you to back up when you were maybe when you’re younger Kenneth and you said like, you know, what was that one gift that you were given like? And how does that help? How do you help people today connect those dots for us?

Kenneth:

Yeah. I would say that, I mean, I grew up, you know, as a Christian, I’m still a Christian and whatnot. But, uh, you know, just being in an environment where I was taught to be grateful, taught to, you know, wake up and give my best taught to, to do a good job for people. I mean, this was the culture of what I grew up doing. My mom really pushed that in me, and it transcends Christianity, I hope nobody just takes that and writes it off. You know, it’s, it’s that concept because there’s a lot of people out there doing the opposite, they’re waking up, they look around them, and they’re miserable, right? You know, they, they just, they’re victimized, they’re feeling like, like, the world is against them. And, and they’re, they’re not looking to give, they’re looking to say, How can I? How can I, you know, be, you know, taken to where everyone else is, right? You know, there’s, there’s a lack of abundance in their life or that they feel, and so they don’t want to give and so, I would say that it’s just a step by step, always trying to go the extra mile that builds upon itself that compounds upon itself. And then now, you know, my goal is to, you know, give more than I take, you know, obviously, I want to give people the best content, the best research my best when I present myself education-wise, and so I would say that’s the biggest thing. I mean, it’s not like an overly technical thing. It’s more of a mindset, you know, because that’s really where it all starts, it starts in you. And I’m just I’m so grateful thinking back because I didn’t know what that would lead to. I didn’t know what that foundation would ultimately become. But I look back and I’m like, my goodness, I’m so glad I had that foundation, because it built something so beautiful, later on down the road.

Brett:

Excellent. Love that. That’s amazing. So now let’s dive into some more of your insights when it comes to cryptocurrency real estate, and investing in general. Most of our guests are real estate, heavy commercial real estate experts, right. And we’ve, we have a lot of that. So I’m really excited to kind of connect the two abridge the two here. And so walk us through your journey of going into that, you know, that New World, let’s say, you know, it’s still kind of a new world. It’s kind of a wild, wild, wild west, right into the internet into this, this thing called cryptocurrency. But talk about that and talk about your journey with it. And would your take on just investing in those types of assets?

Kenneth:

Yeah, well, for me, it all was about, you know, looking for an area to invest in. I mean, as long as I’m investing in something ethical, I’m just looking for an opportunity to make money. But what really led me down that rabbit hole was the precious metals, you know, being involved with precious metals, and then seeing what’s going on with the government. I mean, right now we have a situation where, you know, they printed seven times the amount of money, they didn’t do a crisis in response to this illness in a matter of months. And so things are really ramping up in our environment, you know, money’s getting printed into oblivion, it’s not really like a tinfoil hat thing anymore. But people really can see that things are problematic in the world. I mean, the government’s, you know, running at full bore, I mean, 33% drop in our GDP. I mean, imagine if that was a company, right? You know, that’s the US GDP 33% drop. So yeah, anticipating that knowing that, you know, we were kind of headed for something like this, nobody could have predicted the illness. But then, in terms of, hey, we’re kind of getting to a point where this is all dependent on easy money, and that it led me down to alternative finite assets if you will. And that’s why I like real estate. You know, it’s gonna take however many, you know, annual earnings to buy a house, whether that’s, you know, a million dollars if the minimum wage is, you know, whatever, $10,000 an hour, let’s say, or, you know, what, I’m just making up numbers right now, but it doesn’t matter what the dollar is, you know, that’s going to have valuable real estate is going to have that real hour by hour value. And so that led me down to more speculative investment, you know, an early-stage investment, gold has had 5000 years for people to attempt to figure the price out. It just hit $2,000 By the way, like 10 minutes ago. But, you know, we’ve had 5000 years to kind of try to figure out what the price of gold is. Bitcoin has been around for roughly 10 years. It’s so Early-stage and the world has still yet to really appreciate it. So there’s that, in my opinion, an asymmetric return because I believe there’s going to be more buyers than there are sellers. When it comes to Bitcoin and something like Etherium over the longer term, and it’s still such an early stage, it’s about $250 billion market cap, Bitcoin while gold is like a $10 trillion market cap, and again, it’s that early stage and you know, if I can make an analogy, Bitcoin is like seeing a five-year-old LeBron James. I know, it’s, it’s a little more speculative. But you can see that this child has so much potential, the way he dribbles the way, he interacts with the ball and shoots and it’s just like, but you don’t know if it’s gonna throw a tantrum or not. 

Brett:

Right.

Kenneth:

I just think there’s a lot of early-stage upside in it, as opposed to something like precious metals, which is, you know, a little more efficiently priced with upside when it comes to what’s going on in the economy.

Brett:

Wow, so much wisdom right there. And so much just clarity, because yeah, I mean, the seven times the amount of money printed, and this COVID-19 crisis over ‘08, right. And we thought, Oh, it was the end all be all right? Now imagine the amount they’ve thrown at it. And so where does inflation go? Where do you know, where does all this? What does all this bubble that they’re blowing up? Right? I think one thing we’ve I’m studying more and more is the crest and the falls of these, these, you know, dips of this market cycle, right. And if anyone I think most would agree the last few years have been a seller’s market, it’s been a rapid high appreciation, things are like all-time highs. And now we’re kind of maybe at a crest, we’re gonna take a little bit of time. But now then the Fall is going to come next. That’s the thought of real estate in my real estate mine. And typically, these are, you know, seven to nine-year cycles to kind of go up and up and back up and back. So talk about what you think is coming here in the next three 612 months.

Kenneth:

It’s an interesting thing. We’re really in unprecedented territories. We’re living in a world where fundamentals don’t really match what’s going on with valuations. I mean, you could see what happened with Warren Buffett earlier this year, where he missed the bottom of the march lows, right, you know, he was on the sidelines with lots of money, saying everything’s too expensive. But, you know, obviously, things have recovered in a major way, despite things being overvalued at the March lows, you know, what I’m saying? So, I think you have to be open because there’s always like, you can be 100% fundamental, or just, I don’t know, you know, whatever the other opposite end of the spectrum is, but I think you just have to be open to the idea that they’re gonna continue to print and the dollar is not your friend. So owning things like a company, which makes money and they can charge higher prices, and you know, be around in this environment, is probably going to be more expensive in relation to dollars. And I’ll give you an interesting stat, like the money supply has grown since about the 1950s at a 6.7% annualized interest rate, which also tends to correlate with the annual growth of stocks, and real estate. So when it comes to, you know, assets growing, it’s really there’s a large correlation to what’s going on with the money supply, year after year. And this year, we’ve seen a huge injection of empty money supply go into the system. And sure enough, what did we see happen with stocks, you know, real estate became supported in a major way, I thought real estate was gonna really collapse, you know, fund them on a fundamental basis. But I also knew that they were throwing trillions of dollars at the system, $200, checks, PPP, all these different things. And so the money’s got to go somewhere. And so to that degree, it just depends on what the government’s going to do. I believe they’re going to continue throwing money at the citizens, because what else are they going to do? You know, I have tenants right now in Florida, who are, you know, in the process of getting evicted? Because they’re not, you know, they’re not paying their rent now. We’ve tried to work with them and whatnot. But you know, and that’s, that’s my own personal situation. But I think it’s going to happen in a big way here, you know, with so many people employed. And I think the government’s going to say, Hey, you know, we need to do more, we need to do more until ultimately, there’s a fallout, but even then, the fallout is going to be in the currency. Right? And so I think that owning things like real estate, gold and silver, Bitcoin, and even good stocks is going to To be a hedge against the problems that are going on with the currency and the inflating currency that we have,

Brett:

Let’s talk about diversification here in a minute. But remind everybody we’re speaking with Keneth Ameduri. And he is to crush the street calm as well as crushthestreet.com. So with that being said, Kenneth talked about the importance of diversification in a market like this, as well as liquidity, and not having too much debt or being debt-free. What if those three, you know, walk us through why that’s so important right now, more than ever.

Kenneth:

Yeah, well, I mean, diversifying is your friend against not losing money? You know, one of the most frustrating things was watching 2011 to 20. I call it really the 2018 market and precious metals where man looks at all this craziness going on and gold just kept floundering, you know, despite the fundamentals that, you know, we’ve been looking at, you know, now we’re starting to see things play out. But despite how certain you are about what the analysis should be, you have to be open to being wrong. And that’s the importance of diversification, you know, mean, that even though I had certain ideas of how I expected things to play out, I didn’t invest 100%, in one way or another, because I’m open to the idea of being wrong. If I knew 100%, something was going to go a certain way, why diversify? Right, but what’s the point, just invest in what you think is going up 100% and do that. So the idea of being wrong, and being exposed to different areas and changes in the environment is extremely important, especially as we live in an age where things are changing so fast, right? I mean, the Fang stocks, you know, on paper, were extremely overvalued in 2019, you know, representing large portions of the s&p 500, the, obviously, the NASDAQ, but my goodness, going into COVID, the illness here, they got even bigger, while the rest of the economy shrunk, you know, people are on Facebook, more Netflix, Amazon, you know, it’s just again, things that you may not have anticipated, you’re like, hey, these are way overvalued. But all of a sudden, they get even more overvalued, in a way, going up, even more, you know, with something you can’t really anticipate. So you have to be open to being wrong. And I think that’s the importance of diversification.

Brett:

Yeah, I think it comes down to a part of its humility, right. And part of it is not having too much pride. And, and a part of us is common sense. You know, we don’t put all the eggs in one basket and have diversification. That being said, I want to, I want to, I want to touch on this. So what we do at capital gains tax solutions is provide a tax deferral strategy called the deferred sales trust when people can sell highly appreciated assets. And then the beauty of it is to diversify into non-light kinds of assets. So for example, we just did a $7.6 million property in Georgia, and the gentleman has all of his money inside of a real estate deal. And he was going to do a 1031 exchange. But he goes, why don’t I want to just continue on that path, especially with COVID-19. Let me pay off all my debt, go into the deferred sales trust, and then he put it into hard money lending. And he’s been sitting there for a while. And then in the bank, too, he actually could have bought up the low and we told him he could look at stocks, bonds, mutual funds, but he decided not to. Because he was concerned with what was going on. He’s kicking himself now. But that being said, moving forward, he’s planning to put it with multiple commercial real estate deals, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, some stuff of his own. In other words, he’s diversifying, versus just selling one light kind asset and buying one other light kind asset of equal or greater value. So what do you think, you know, with having that cup of opportunity, what would that mean for an investor like that?

Kenneth:

So, again, it’s all about taking that activity. So there’s also this component of like, active income, where, you know, this is part of my business, you know, some of my investments too, I feel is like, operational, like, it’s, you know, this is how I make my money. This is active. This is, you know, I might make a little bit I might make a lot, it’s a little more speculative, I’m aggressive, but then it guys it kind of goes into the category of savings, right? And once it goes into that category of savings, I really want to protect it, you know, in a way that’s not activated, like a God into that savings category in my life. And now that’s what I really want to solidify there. So there’s that operation, you know, do what you got to do. I mean, even the expenses for my business I’ll spend, you know, a lot more money aggressively on things that are going on in my business, but then, you know, we go out to dinner. I’m like, wait, what are we buying here? You know, I mean, like something stupid, right? We Um, it’s just my mindset is a lot more different when it comes to like operations. And then it goes into that savings category, like, I’m solidifying this, this, this gain I had. So that’s the importance of it. And that’s what I would say, for people paying off debt is huge. And I think a lot of people are going and looking at what happened during this illness. Realize that, you know, we went from just like things going crazy, you know, the stock market’s going up people getting all these raises, in this, this moat that people felt like they had around them that, you know, was largely unstoppable. Just being taken out in an instant, you know, just the rug pulled out right from under them, and what a learning experience that was. And on paper, you know, it was like, okay, you know, you should always have a mortgage, you know, to invest the difference, but, man, you know, certain investments that you think are assets can quickly become liabilities in the wrong environment. So, again, that peace of mind of paying something off, that’s not you can’t calculate that, return that ROI. So, you know, just and I’m fine with it, I have some debt, and I use it in a way that I feel is appropriate. But you know, being able to quickly pay it off or having a strategy. I mean, all these things are going to go towards you having peace of mind, which I think is you can’t calculate that sort of ROI. But you know, using it wisely, I mean, there’s nothing wrong with that, you know, and obviously, I do hard money lending I, I leverage other people. Yeah,

Brett:

Yeah, it’s a place for all of it, right. And time is a time to sell a time to buy the time to be in debt and to be out of debt. Right? A time to maybe go a little more aggressive on spending time to say, right, so that’s the point of having wisdom and having that mindset. And I like the idea of what you’re talking about, about essentially taking what’s active or something that you’ve built. And it’s like, it’s almost like it’s harvest season, not you. He built this for all these years, and now you’re going to harvest it, and you’re going to retire the debt. Right? And you’re going to put it towards more savings, right? So it’s, there’s some emotional thing about that, right, and not just doubling down and losing it. All right. So there’s there I think if I’m hearing you, right, but it’s about retiring the debt, put it into savings diversifying. And then yeah, at another time, perhaps is another time to launch that new thing. But of course, it depends on the season of life, you’re in this gentleman. He’s a baby boomer, he’s older, he’s done it for 30 years, you know, and he’s just been through too many market cycles to be like, I’m not gonna overpay for a 1031 property, and have all my eggs in one basket and keeping all that dead, his biggest thing was, like, oh, I can actually retire the debt. Now I can be out of the debt and tax-deferred. So that being said, Any thoughts on that before the move to the next question?

Kenneth:

Ah, no, not really. I mean, just I agree with it. And you know, it’s interesting, some people come to me, and it’s, it’s like, they want to talk about, you want to talk about, you know, what they do with their money. And, you know, I got to ask them a little How old are you? Right? You know, if you’re 25, and you’re like, you’re gonna invest 100% of your $500 paycheck, you just got, that’s a lot different than someone who’s worked for 30 years, who has 30 years worth of time and effort and energy, and what might be a million dollars, $500,000 $100,000 It doesn’t matter. How much did that mean to you, you know, someone who’s, you know, got a $500 paycheck, you know, and that’s everything they have. I mean, it’s all different, right? So I guess you just really have to think about where you are in your life. And also, it made me think about, you know, how I like to invest in deals I like to, you know, really make sure that losing money is not going to happen, if possible. And that’s my goal. And so like hard money lending, you know, I really like to make sure I have a certain amount of equity, right? I mean, just basic things. There’s like, you know, worst-case scenario, you don’t make a single payment to me, I take the house, I sell it and I at least break even, right, you know, I mean, that’s just like common sense sort of thing. And that for somebody might be a pretty, pretty good way for someone that’s older than them to have money that wants to be able to sleep at night to do you know, if you work with the proper people, you can do that. I mean, it’s a great way to invest your money in my opinion, you can get great returns to you know, lending money privately.

Brett:

Yeah, excellent. Thanks for sharing. I absolutely love him. He is exactly the reason he did that. So, we’ll touch on this last question, then we’ll go into the lightning round. What’s the biggest frustration or mistake a client a friend or partner has made when it comes to capital gains tax deferral?

Kenneth:

I would just say we had a weird situation happen. Kind of during The 2017 crypto boom, we did reg well, investing in crypto and whatnot. And anyway, that was another deal, you know, trying to scrape the last bit of gains and just hope that this kept going. But it was towards the end of the bubble, we made another investment, there was about $200,000, we invested in a blockchain startup, there was this idea. We invested in the pre-IPO round. And the business just never launched. I mean, just after that December into January, that 2018, crash, there was just zero enthusiasm. For crypto. So the ability to raise more money to get things off the ground to launch what was going to be that business just never happened. And so, you know, it was, you know, honestly, when my tax guy was like, Hey, we need to do our taxes in like, 2019, you know, I had to go back and look and see, you know, well, when did this investment go worthless, you know, and it was great. I mean, it was money that we put on a little sailboat, and it just watched it float out into the ocean into the middle of nowhere, there was no defining buy, there was a defining buy, but there was no defining sell point where we could capture a defined loss on this. So it was just a matter of investigating, talking with the company, and just discussing with them, when was the material sale? You know, when was the material loss? effectively done? And that was just a complicated thing, right there. I mean, you asked me like, what was the most, you know, the difficult thing we deal with? I mean, that was just an obscure thing that happened to me. And, it kind of tells the story of, you know, me investing and losing money in the crypto bubble, you know, trying to make a little bit of extra money and losing some money there. But, you know, and experiencing that, that tax issue.

The idea of being wrong, and being exposed to different areas and changes in the environment is extremely important, especially as we live in an age where things are changing so fast - Kenneth Ameduri Click To Tweet

 

Brett:

Yeah, that’s great. Thanks for sharing that. On the other side of that. I’m curious, how are you know, friends, family, clients, partners, in the game? And when they’re selling and taking their games? Are they just paying that tax? Or what are you guys doing there to try to mitigate that capital gains tax?

Kenneth:

While everyone does deals with their tax person and their accountants, but you know, if they’re holding these positions for more than a year, they get the long-term capital gain. If it’s short term, it’s the income. So it’s not something that we personally advise people on.

Brett:

Got it! Perfect. Are you ready for the lightning round?

Kenneth:

Let’s do it.

Brett:

All right, knowing what you know. Now, if you go back to your 25-year-old self with the one Golden Nugget, you would make sure you would do or know.

Kenneth:

Oh, I would say have more confidence in myself.

Brett:

Beautiful. What is the one book you’ve recommended or gifted the most in the past year?

Kenneth:

Think and Grow Rich.Crushing the Street with Kenneth Ameduri - Crypto Currency, Real Estate and Precious Medals

Brett:

Give me mobile or digital resources you recommend for your business?

Kenneth:

I read Zero Hedge regularly. I think it’s a great source

Brett:

Beautiful, favorite leadership quote or theme you try to live by? Hmm.

Kenneth:

The harder I work, the more luck I seem to find. I think it was a Thomas Jefferson quote, roughly

Brett:

Beautiful. How do you stay centered after all your success? And this is the last question here. And all of your experience and all of your struggles and achievements. How do you stay centered in your values and encouraged to reach for new goals?

Kenneth:

It’s a growing experience, something that I struggle with and have had success with, kind of ebbs and flows. But it’s a tough thing. Because, you know, you have to, you know, I’m young, I’m in my early 30s. And it’s one of those things where, you know, I’ve made it in certain ways, but I’m not done living. So I got to keep going. Right? I have to, you know, I was a young when I was young, I was like, man, I’ll do anything I’ll you know, sweep the floors and whatnot, you know, and I was really aggressive and now, I have a family have a business, you know, I have a portfolio to protect, and it’s like, things are not as aggressive in a sense because I need to be smart to not lose what I’ve built up. You know, there’s also that aspect, you know, in the early stage, it’s, you have nothing to lose, but you also have to Nothing to lose. And you know, you’re just willing to do anything. But now it’s like, you really got to be careful with the things you do, where you allocate your time, where you allocate your resources. And where you put your investments. And that diversified word becomes so much more important as you get older, and you build and so I am really, I’m really trying to stay balanced in that. And then also, it’s a lifestyle, you know, things change, you know, you people see you differently. And, you know, and not that I go around bragging or anything like that, but, you know, people, some of my friends, they know, I’ve made some money in my life. And it’s, it’s people change, you know, in a way, the way they perceive you. And there’s that old saying, you know, it’s kind of lonely at the top. It’s lonely at the top, because it’s hard for people to relate to you, it’s so hard for a lot of people to relate to you. When you make, you know, a good amount of money. And so it’s for me, it’s about being relatable to other people staying humble and staying, being able to connect with other people. Because I think that’s a really important thing. Because in life, you know, relationships, you know, love the people around us. I mean, those are the things that matter. And obviously, if you’re getting to a point where you just, you can’t relate to people, I mean, you go, you’ll be depressed, which will compound and wreck everything you have

Brett:

So much wisdom there. And Kenneth, I want to thank you for being on the show for sharing your inspiration, your story, your knowledge, while so much we covered here in the last 3540 minutes here. But that being said, I want to encourage you to keep using the gifts and talents you’ve been given to bless others and make a difference financially for so many folks. But would you remind our listeners one last time where they can find you and then we’ll call today?

Kenneth:

Thanks, Brett, appreciate everyone tuning in and listening to me especially this far. If you want more of this Feel free to visit me at crushthestreet.com. Thank you so much.

Brett:

Thanks, everybody. And thanks for listening to another episode of the Capital Gains Tax Podcast.

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Crushing the Street with Kenneth Ameduri - Crypto Currency, Real Estate and Precious Medals

About Kenneth Ameduri

Kenneth Ameduri is the chief editor and co-founder of financial publication letter CrushTheStreet.com. He was a founder in Future Money Trends and Wealth Research Group, which have gone on to be vital sources of education and wealth for hundreds of thousands of readers. In his 20s, Kenneth has founded multiple businesses that have gone on to be worth millions of dollars. Kenneth was also a founder of FMT Advisory, which successfully manages millions of dollars in client funds. He is an ardent student of Austrian economics and anticipating market trends as he has successfully invested and built companies for more than 15 years. Kenneth spends his time relentlessly analyzing resource, tech and other sectors, uncovering areas in which equity can be captured and a profit can be made. Kenneth is passionate about sharing the lessons of success and failure that have led him to where he is today through his work published weekly at CrushTheStreet.com.

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