Jonathan DeYoe has led an independent financial planning firm since 2002. He and the Mindful Money team work one on one with three hundred families and foundations. The Mindful Money team offers simple steps to financial success and tools to mindfully overcome emotional and cognitive biases related to money. He is passionate about spreading the values of goal-focused and planning-driven wealth management to help people enjoy better financial outcomes AND live happier lives!

His personal goal is to touch 1,000,000 lives in 10 years with Mindful Money financial education courses. He has been a California-based financial adviser for 25 years. He managed investments at a variety of Wall Street Companies before founding his own financial planning firm. He’s a contributor on personal finance matters for the Huffington Post, and Business Insider, among others and he has been featured in the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

 

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Unlocking Your Money Mindfulness with Jonathan DeYoe

 

Brett:

I’m excited about our next guest. He’s born and raised in Rapid City, South Dakota, and he moved to Berkeley, California in 1994, to attend the graduate theological union Institute of Buddhist studies. The following year, he began his career in financial services and found his true vocation. Although he enjoys the puzzled look on people’s faces when they first hear of this unlikely professional transition, it is clear to all who work with mindful money that this gentleman’s unique background informs his unwavering commitment to providing truly holistic wealth management. Please welcome to the show with me, Jonathan DeYoe. Jonathan, how are you doing?

Jonathan:

I’m well, Brett. I’m excited about the conversation.

Brett:

Thanks for being here.for our listeners to get to know you for the first time. Would you give us a little bit more about your story and your current focus?

Jonathan:

It’s you made a perfect introduction. I mean, the idea very similar, very simply, is that I’m a seminarian. I came to California to actually study Lutheran theology, I turned into a Buddhist academic, and then I turned into a financial advisor, and that the arc of that story actually talks about investing all my life. I’ve invested in public markets for 40 years, and in real estate for probably 20 years and in private markets for probably 15 years, I have a ton of experience in investing. But I bring to the investing this general understanding that not all people want to be active investors. The niche I’ve carved out is to help people who aren’t really interested in pursuing it personally actively, engaging deeply in markets are more interested in their family in their writing, or their arts, or their business, their building, or what have you, they’re not interested in managing money. I work with a lot of those kinds of people on a simple process for building and managing wealth and bringing simplicity. Mindfulness has been a boon for both my career and for our clients.

Brett:

We’re going to talk about unlocking your money and mindfulness. We’re gonna be digging deep here in a minute. But before we go there, Jonathan, I will do want to take one other step back, I believe we’ve all been given certain gifts in this life. Some people call them superpowers, some people call them strengths, I believe they’re, they’re given to us, by God, in the beginning, is to be a blessing and help to others. I’m curious, maybe going back to your studies before in high school when you’re younger. What are those one or two gifts that you believe you were given? And how does that help how you help and bless people today?

Jonathan:

Gifts given as a child, I think that the most important thing that I was I was given by my parents was a belief that I could do it was just an understanding that you put in the work you put in the effort and belief that I could do it, we, we didn’t have money we didn’t have you know, we were poor. For most of my growing up, my parents didn’t really were unemployed. For most of my growing up, I ran businesses that weren’t very successful. Last businesses lost real estate in, to lenders, these kinds of things. We struggled a lot financially, but they always said, Jonathan, you work hard, you put you do your homework, you work hard, you work harder than anyone else, you will be successful.

That belief is probably the first and most important thing that they gave me. The second most important thing they gave me was the ability to focus on the stuff that’s good in our life. We didn’t have much as I said, but we had more than others. My parents had no problem sharing what we had with people that had even less.so when you think about the financial courses that we’ve built, you think about the work with clients and the work that we do. One of the things that, working with wealthy people is interesting, but one of the things I’m most curious about now is how do I help other people become wealthy? How do I help other people reach their life’s success? Reach well being reach happiness and feel financial? I want people to have enough and feel that they have enough.

Brett:

Jonathan, that’s beautiful. It’s a great way to segue into unlocking money mindfulness for all of us here. By the way, if you want to learn more about Jonathan Do you can go to mindful dot money. That’s mindful money. Jonathan, let’s dive right in what is the net number one secret to unlocking your money mindfulness or our money mindfulness, what would be the first thing you would like to share with us here?

Jonathan:

The most important thing I think we can do is actually go inside. This makes a lot of sense. We think about my background, starting off as a seminarian, and becoming a Buddhist, academic. You don’t have to meditate, I recommend that you do. But you don’t have to that the most important part of any financial plan is understanding what you’re planning for.to understand what you’re planning for. That’s goals. That’s one of the things that are most important to you. That starts with purpose, and purpose starts with values. We have built a course and it’s free on our website when you go to it. It’s a values purpose and goals course. The most important step, when you’re starting to think about your financial future, is really understanding what you want it to look like, once you know what you want it to look like, it’s very easy to create a plan and get there.

But if you don’t know if you don’t go internal if you don’t think about it, and go and spend some time with it, the world will just give you things to be worried about the world will well just wonderfully here you should pursue this or you should pursue that your parents will give you a job path, your peer group will tell you how to spend your money. If you go to social media, you’ll see the kinds of things you’re supposed to want. But if you don’t go internal and think about it yourself, you’ll never know what will bring you happiness and will bring you wellbeing. You’ll always be on the search for more. That’s unnecessary, you don’t need more, you need enough.

Brett:

Make sure I capture that.go inside. That could involve meditating or not. But you do recommend that and really understand your values, your purpose and your goals. What is it that you’re planning for, for this chapter of your life at the season of your life for the future of your life and your family, and how that involves with financing, finances, and then I do like that, quote, he said, that world will give you things to worry about. Isn’t that so true? I mean, that’s where we’re at in this world, where they’re telling us everything we should be worried about, we should be angry about, we should be upset about what we should be doing something about. I mean, it’s constant, and it’s from me 100 voices, and 100 directions 100 times a day. It can be quite a bit of the opposite of being mindful, it can be kind of chaotic. Maybe walk us into the second secret or the second step, once you’ve done the first one, but, but also any thoughts on what I just said?

Jonathan:

I mean, it’s so true. We are inundated every day, and there’s something just to understand, and that’s everyone is selling you everything you hear every message, every commercial, every political message every everyone is trying to get you on their side everyone is, is and that doesn’t, that’s not bad. Like, we should just expect that. People are going to look out for what’s important to them. Like maybe, maybe it’s, animals in the shelter that’s important to them. They’re going to post things on Facebook, or on Twitter about how you should support animals in the shelter. Maybe it’s, maybe it’s financial, maybe it’s, helping the homeless, maybe it’s whatever it is, every message you get is designed to move you in some way. Or to show you how important the messenger is. If you just, if you understand that, then you go, well, that’s their thing. What’s my thing? So we keep coming back to that first thing is what’s important to me, what do I need to do, when it comes to in our spaces is finance, I work with a lot of entrepreneurs, we work with a lot of, artists, writers that are very successful.

The thing that they want to do is they want to build something, they want to write something, they want to create a company, they don’t want to worry about their finances. What we’ve created is we’ve created the easiest path, which for us is more like passive investing. I know a lot of your listeners and I’ve listened to a few of your, your episodes are very active in the process. There are some people that are very active, and that’s fantastic. That’s what they want to do. There are some people that don’t want to think about the money, they actually want to be dedicated to something else they want to be dedicated to, to their art or to their business, or to their nonprofit that they founded or what have you. In doing that, they still have to keep an eye on it, they still have to think about it, they still have to, they still have to pay some attention to their own financial success. Because one day we all retire one day, we all rely on those assets. One day, we need an income that we can’t outlive, in retirement at some point, so how do we get there?

Brett:

I think that’s there’s a lot of wisdom there. And it is understanding that we’re being, words matter and what we allow into our hearts into our minds, right and everyone, if people care right about they and there’s passion in this world and that’s important, but realize that it’s it can be it may not be aligned with your values and your purpose and your goals and what you’ve been called to do and the people you’ve been called to serve, and it’s protecting yourself from not being inundated with things that are distracting or not helping can you and your purpose so? That’s kind of understanding that where we’re at and the realities of those facts. Maybe that’s kind of step number one, what would be step number two, once we’re moving towards money mindfulness was the second secret here.

Jonathan:

The first step is understanding where you’re going. The second step is actually creating a plan to get there, is understanding the trade-offs you’re gonna have to make along the way, in the process of setting your goals, you’re doing a couple of things, one, you’re identifying the things that are important to you, too, you’re identifying the things that are not as important to you. Now, as you move forward into the world, that you’ve agreed, in this process, you’ve agreed that I’m not going to pursue this and this and this, and that I have the higher probability of achieving this, and this and this, and this, I’m trading things off in my life. How this shows up in life, and in many, many places, and I live here in the San Francisco Bay area. It’s very expensive to live here. But there’s a question if it’s cheaper to live in Pinole and commute to San Francisco, and you can get a bigger house for that, is it worth the two hour time spent commuting every day.

These are trade-offs, these are trade-offs, we can make either just happenstance, or we can make intentionally and get that intentional trade-off. To write these into a documented plan that can carry you through your plan is something that can do two things for you. It can defend you against bad decisions. What is my plan Sam is supposed to do here? It can also be the thing that pulls you through what are my goals? Well, I have those were my plan. If I just follow this plan, I see that 10 years of doing this, I’ll get to this thing that I that’s really important to me, whether it’s retirement or sending a kid to school or that the second home purchase that’s, in Napa or up in Tahoe. Having these things written down, creating a path, which is no date specific dollar specific, that fits within your resources, like how much can I save to actually make these things happen, and then simplifies the step that most advisors spend the most time on simplifies the investment step, it’s investing shouldn’t be that complex, who shouldn’t be that active?

The research tells us that those folks who are the most active are not necessarily the most successful. The people that are most active, but the most effort and time into investing in a better way, don’t actually end up with better returns. What can you do to do it really simply and really easily and still get there? The first guy knows where there is gotta make your trade-offs. Then you keep it simple.

Brett:

Tons of wins are there and it makes me think of the quote, that we’re either living in apprehension or anticipation. It’s our choice. It’s mostly dependent upon the plan of what you’re designing like a life plan, a financial plan, a health plan, all the major areas of our lives, and a lot of the world and we can even fall, if we’re out of the habit of planning and reviewing the plan and living by the plan, we can fall into the apprehension stage, where it’s, we kind of get caught up in the distractions in the chaos, and just the speed and the pace of life and information, versus living in what’s called anticipation, where we have that clear vision of that plan of those goals, right of the why behind those, the meaningful part of the purpose, the values, everything’s aligned there. It’s it has a way of like a magnet, like pulling you towards that, as you’re focusing on those things. Because where you’re for your focus is the energy follows. Or the energy is a part of where you’re focusing on and so realizing those two things. I want to focus on the one thing to say, like, identify what’s important, what’s not important. And I think there’s like, there’s a time to say yes, and a time to say no. What’s your best personal secret? Of saying no, saying no, Jonathan, what do you do thereto, to help to defend against those things that are distracting from your purpose?

Jonathan:

I am so bad at saying no, I am not the one that takes advice on saying no, I often what we’ve done so this the questions I get are questions that I need to say no to more often are questions of, time. Jonathan, can you come and do this? Can you come and do that? Can you serve on this board? Can you help this committee? Can you fundraise for this thing, or do this other thing, and they’re all fantastic, they’re all wonderful, well, meaning people that have very important work, and they want help, and they deserve help. My gut is to help my gut is to find a way to do it. What ends up happening, though, is when you spread yourself really, really, really thin. across many, many, many people ask and many, many questions. You’re not doing anyone any good. You’re certainly not doing your health, any good or your own, personal goals any good. So, remembering your plan, remembering what you have to do to fulfil your plan. Then and then choose selectively the things that you can engage in that you’re passionate about that you want to do and you want to support. Then you have to you basically have to have a rope phrase. You know what, and this is, this is one of our phrases that I use, and I actually counselled clients on this as well.

You may know this if you get involved in philanthropy and you start giving money away. Once you give money to an organization, that organization has a process to move you up the pyramid of giving. They, they that you give them $1,000 Next year, this Hey, thanks for that $1,000.this year, it’d be really great, we have these great projects and great things we want to do, it’d be great if you could give us 2500. Then if you do that this year, then then the next year, it’ll be 5000. Nothing wrong with that, I expect that time every single time I do it, there’s a phrase you need to create, you need to have a ready thing to say, whether it’s time or money, what I have committed my space, or my money or my time or my expertise for the year. I’m gonna review this with my wife, or my family, or my committee or my team at the end of the year for or to do next year. Please give me the details. I will review it with my team. Then we’ll go over the things we’re gonna actually focus on. then, and then stick with it, like you’ve made a decision, you’re going to have a team, you’ve got your family, your wife, your partner, that you want to do this with. Now that you know what it is do that and just have a process and build a process around it. That will, that will empower you to say no, again, whether it’s money spent or time spent. I am horrible at it. But I know there’s a process in place. I still end up probably saying yes, more often than I should

 

Unlocking Your Money Mindfulness with Jonathan DeYoe

Unlocking Your Money Mindfulness: “You work hard, you do your homework, you work hard, you work harder than anyone else, you will be successful.” – Jonathan DeYoe

 

Brett:

Having that plan of response. We’re not acting out of just emotion or again, apprehension, we’re actually living in anticipation. We’re living purposefully with our goals in mind. I like that I have a commitment, I have committed my time, my energy, my finances for this year, and I’ll review with my team or my family. Then I will assess based upon that. Is that a fair summary of that phrase? Do you want to say one more time?

Jonathan:

I think you said it right. I mean, that was perfect. We’ll assess at the end of the year, and then we’ll, we’ll review the request and review the request in the context of all the other requests. We’ll see whether I have time for that committee or that or money for that giving next year.

Brett:

That’s great. Step one was, getting going in going internal, and going focus and meditating and focusing on on the values, purpose and goals. Step two is creating that plan. I imagined step three is maybe executing, or could you walk us through what the next step is?

Jonathan:

Step three is, as you said, its execution. It’s not, it should be very, very, very simple. In my book, I mean, we talk about the first section of the book, we talk about all the curious illusions that that Wall Street in our culture kind of puts in our way to keep the keep us from being very successful and there and there, their sales tactics. There are just some belief systems that don’t that aren’t helpful. In the middle section of the book, we talked about this whole process of discovering your values, figuring out what’s important to you, and then pursuing that specific thing. Then the third section, the book is we’re talking about how do we build a plan based on those values and those goals. If you think about going from values to goals, you have, you’ve got goals that are 10 years away, 20 years away, 30 years away, and then you can back into actions you can back into execution. If you have a goal, I’m I turned 50 last week. If my goal is to retire at 65, that’s 15 years away, I can say, this is the pool of assets, I need 15 years from now so that I can have an income stream that I can’t outlive. What do I need to say, between here and that date?

What are the kinds of returns I need between here and that date, to make that possible? And so by backing into it, I know that today, I have to say $500 a month, $1,000 a month, whatever it is, $20,000 a year, whatever those numbers are to meet your plan and your needs and your goals. You’ve backed into what those steps are today. So if you know what you need to save, then guess what? That that actually backs up further into? What am I doing for work? What do I have to do to work? Do I have to earn more to make that possible? Do I have to get it to get another, advanced certificate or a degree or what do I have to do to make sure that happens? Oh, and if you do this early enough in life, it gets a lot easier. But every time you know some of that’s 5560 just starting this process just starting to think about this it’s amazing to me that people don’t actually set goals they just kind of you know shoot from their hip their whole lives. I hate the gun metaphors, but that’s what people do. But we see it all the time. Someone comes to us late in life, no plan, can I retire in five years? Sure, you may have to make a lot of trade-offs to make that possible. But if you start earlier, you’re much better off.

Brett:

Very well said by the way can learn more about Jonathan DeYoe at Mindful Money that’s Mindful.Money. Let’s shift into the segment of the show where we talk about capital gains tax deferral. I grew up in the Bay Area Mission San Jose Fremont not too far from Pinole. It’s in fact, my wife and I got engaged in San Francisco. We, we love the Bay Area, a lot of wealth, a lot of appreciation, right growing up in the bay area houses and housing values went from, pretty reasonably priced 30 years ago to just maybe some of the most expensive innovation. You get folks who want to sell these high-end primary homes want to sell commercial real estate, folks that are in the tech industry that are selling businesses that have startups and have capital gains tax, and it’s somewhere between 30 and 50% of their gain, depending on depreciation recapture and a couple of other things. I’m curious, what’s the biggest frustration you’ve seen with clients, friends or family when it comes to selling highly appreciated assets, they want to defer the capital gains tax on.

Jonathan:

I have, this may be a unique practice. I mean, in my practise, we work with a lot of very wealthy people. But most of the people we work with aren’t as tax-averse, as many wealthy people you read about a year about. In fact, most of my clients would say, we should have a little bit higher income tax on them. Obviously, no one likes to play capital gains. But there are tools that we use so that I’ll just explain one of the tools we use the most often, especially this last year, has been a charitable remainder trust so so most of my clients have enough assets that they are in a position that they’re giving it away anyway. If you’re giving it away, anyways, then you have an asset you’re going to sell it has it is highly appreciated has a low basis, you can actually tuck that into a charitable vehicle, whether that’s a donor-advised fund, or charitable remainder trust, or something like that.

That eliminates capital gains when you sell it. You can’t do it if it’s encumbered by a loan. There are all kinds of there’s other rules and issues around it. But most of our clients, when they are faced with large capital gains, they’re actually going to look to charitable vehicles to reduce the capital gain. If you use the tradable vehicles the right way, you can actually create an income stream that lasts the rest of your life. Then the remainder goes to charity. That’s what a term remainder trust is. We’ve set up probably, or maybe half a dozen of those, this year, which has been it’s been a great year for that because you’re right assets, and every asset, business assets, stocks, bonds are really good. But also real estate and personal private businesses are just there. The values have just gone off the charts this year. It’s been incredible.

Brett:

We love the CRT, especially charitable, charitable minded, charitable giving, if you’re going to give it away anyway, it’s a great vehicle. It’s tried and true.it’s fantastic for those who are not as charitable inclined, or maybe they’re like, I got 10 million, and definitely terrible and client with three of it. But the other seven, perhaps with my family, or perhaps with just more different entrepreneurial ventures, like I have some clients that, one of the sorts of the primary home of Palo Alto for 3.3 million, and part of his goal was retirement for himself and his kids. He has five kids.it wasn’t his charitable, it’s more like charity starts at home for him on those first five kids. All right. What are some of the things that are solutions that you’ve run into, or challenges you’ve run into for those who aren’t as charitable? 

Jonathan:

The things we’ve used in the past and I’ve, I know, there are a couple of other tools that you guys that you talk about a lot, the different vehicles, the 1031 exchange, you’ve talked about that we’ve used, those clients have used those, the Delaware Statutory Trusts, we’ve used those, so people get some diversification. I’ve actually run a lot into people that did are done managing real estate, as they’ve built wealth through real estate, and they just don’t want to manage anymore. Some of those, some of the vehicles actually been pretty attractive. We actually, don’t broker those anymore. I did seven years ago, but I don’t broker them anymore.it’s we can advise on, we talked to people about how to how to save taxes with using them, but they don’t get them through us. They get them through, other people, other brokers, they do them, they build them themselves through IPX, or, this place out of Chicago that does it. I know you’ve talked about it, and this is I’m actually very curious about the deferred tax trust because I think California has said no to California. Isn’t there something that came out about that? I’d love to hear what your comments are on that.

Brett:

That’s one of the I call the DJI vibe media. Sometimes people will take something out of context, and then they’ll run with it. The deferred sales trust is based on 1920 tax law, it’s an installment sale. It’s federal tax law. Just like IRC 1031. It’s the federal IRC. 453 is federal. The first thing to understand is the deferred sales trust is based upon federal tax law. It’s not it’s not state-specific. Second, the majority of our deals are actually done in California. We’ve never had one single negative result in California in the 25-year history, including 1000s and 1000s and 1000s of closes billions under management. Now this particular franchise tax board notice was sent to qualified intermediaries in regards to installment like structures that were for those other and we like to say we are an installment sale right, but it didn’t specifically say deferred sales trust but a structure that is not basically holding back withholding what’s owed to the Franchise Tax Board. Ee always withholds, and we always hold those rules.

They were specifically targeting exchange accommodators that basically weren’t following the rules as they saw fit. They were noticing them, but some of our competitors, write blogs, and one of our competitors for a lot of folks is the 1031 companies.so they took that notice, and they add it deferred sales trust, and they said, and they said that California calls it illegal, and we’ve literally closed I don’t know, at least 10 deals in California alone, saving multiple failed 1031 exchanges this year, and have never had a single negative result. In fact, the biggest audit was actually taking place in San Diego, California.it was a $125 million commercial property. That was reviewed, that was reviewed and reviewed. That was a no-change audit.so it’s literally batting 1000. But there are those who don’t want you to know about it. They want to keep a lot of clients in the Delaware statutory trusts and or the 1031 exchange. But a lot of baby boomers, a lot of folks don’t want to deal with a toilet to trash liability, or they have like cryptocurrency or primary home that doesn’t even qualify for a Delaware doesn’t qualify for a 1031 or business sale. That’s where we fit in. But it’s interesting to see. So far, we’re batting 1000.it’s working perfectly. But you can learn more about that at Capital Gains Tax solutions.com Does that answer the question?

Jonathan:

It does, well done. Well done.it’s funny, I would hate to be 25. trying to figure this out today, because there’s so much noise. The noise is like I said, Everyone is trying to sell something and that circumstance, it’s 1031 people saying, You know what? This isn’t this isn’t good. Don’t pursue this pursue what we do. That’s, I see that all the time.

Brett:

It’s the reality of it. But yeah, when the tax attorneys also stand behind their work, they provide lifetime audit, defence, state or federal. We also don’t charge anything unless someone actually closes the deal says it literally can no cost due diligence period. Or you can review all this, we can go through it all. Like if you don’t choose it, no problem. Like someone’s got to pay down the 29 trillion. Or go do 1031. That’s great. Like, I’m a California real estate broker myself, I still have my clients who 1030 ones I’ve done Delaware statutory trust. But it’s but it is interesting to see the calls that we get all the time about that, but it’s a part of it. But that being said, we’re running out of time we were ready for the lightning round.

Jonathan:

Let’s do it.

Brett:

All right. Knowing what you know now, if you go back to your 25-year-old self, what is the one golden nugget make sure to tell yourself to do?

Jonathan:

My 25 years old, 25-year-old self when I was 25 and 25-year old self today because today it’d be avoiding distraction, then it would just put your nose to the grindstone. Like literally, when I was a kid I was I didn’t want to so put the nose you know, work hard would be the message today and be like, how do you avoid distraction, do whatever you can’t turn off the notifications, avoid distraction. Distraction will ruin your future.

Brett:

That is such a mindful response, by the way, and I’ve never had someone answer and both sides of the spectrum, if you were 25 today and 25, then and that’s so much wisdom. Thank you for that, Jonathan. Jonathan, I appreciate that second question, what’s the number one book you’ve recommended or gifted the most in the past year. Also, feel free to plug your book that you kind of mentioned a little bit midway through so people know how to find that.

 

Jonathan:

Unlocking Your Money Mindfulness with Jonathan DeYoeThe book I’ve talked about the most I don’t know if you know, is Steven Pressfield, The War of Art. Steven Pressfield writes about resistance about the things that keep us from producing our best work, are the headspace stuff that keeps us from doing our best work. He’s got four or five books on how to write and how to produce, good content and good work. He writes novels, and he writes great stuff. He’s actually the author of The Legend of Bagger Vance, which is a great book. I’ve submitted that given that book away, traded it, offered it shared it so often this year, because it’s what I deal with, it’s my biggest struggle. When I’m in writing my own book, it was Steven Pressfield, his book that helped me push through to finish the first book, and I’m in the middle of my second book. I’m going back to Steven Pressfield, saying “How do I get through this thing?” I think if you’re a writer, or a painter or an artist, you’re going if you’re a business owner, you’re launching businesses and entrepreneurial hat, reading Steven Pressfield work on resistance is I think, incredibly important. Highly recommend.

 

Unlocking Your Money Mindfulness with Jonathan DeYoeBrett:

Also, plug your book real quick to what’s your book at it’s

Jonathan:

Mindful Money, which makes perfect sense, Mindful Money.

 

 

Brett:

Second, the last question, what are you most curious about right now?

Jonathan:

I’m actually in the process of moving away from the entrepreneurial part of my business and towards more direct client work and then writing more. I’m very curious about the future of the financial services industry. I think that probably the prices that people like me charge are going to be reduced over time unless they can boost services and there’s a lot of services that can be increased. That’s part that’s possible. But I’m wondering how we actually move the viewpoint away from the shiny The dot away from the SPAC the NFT, the crypto to the things that are productive assets because I do think that we’re in this period of time where and I have no problem with Bitcoin, I have no problem with crypto, but I have a problem with 4000 Different crypto coins, like one or two of them will be very successful, the blockchain is going to be a very important technological advancement. But there’s a lot of people that have a lot of money being sucked into this right now. Just like there wasn’t calm, just like it wasn’t real estate in 2007, just like there was in oil, it was really expensive, just like Goldman was really expensive. It’s just this is it’s a shiny thing, and everyone chases it with money. Then we create media cycles around it. I’m very curious how we get through this period of excitement and, and frankly, greed. As we get through the excitement and greed, there’s gonna be a lot of things that fail, and there’s gonna be some things that come back and are the work again. That’s it’s, I’m curious about what where the fallout comes from?

Brett:

My very good answer last question. After all, your success, reading your books, helping so many people and all your background and mindful thinking and finances, how do you stay centered? And maybe you kind of answered it the entire show, but how do you stay centered in your values? And how do you stay encouraged to charge forward to reach new heights?

Jonathan:

This is probably not, this is the worst time to introduce this topic. For me, because the end of the show, opens up a whole nother things when we have to talk again. I used to have a very, very, very strong morning routine. My morning routine was about three hours long and involved. I get up, I would meditate, I would read I would write, I would exercise, I would read some more and write some more. But five and a half, six months ago, my brother drowned in the Pacific Ocean. When that happened, it changed a lot for me in terms of what’s important, and it blew my morning routine all to hell. I’m trying to get it back. I’ve been telling myself for the last couple of weeks, this Saturday, we’re gonna roll again, this Saturday when I work out again, we’re going to begin this process and begin digging back in. I think that I built up a bank of resilience and mindfulness in 20 something years of meditation and 20 something years of following that morning practice. But right now, it’s, I am, I think at risk, because my morning, my morning routine is just shot right now. I’m getting it back. But it comes with trauma, it comes with challenge and difficulty. We rebuild.

Brett:

Sorry for your loss. Thank you for sharing that. Absolutely, I’d love to have you back on the show at a later date to discuss that journey if you’re open to that as well as how you know how you reestablish those habits and what you learn from them. I want to thank you, Jonathan, for being on the show. I want to thank you for sharing so much wisdom with us as a part of your story. I want to encourage you to keep using the gifts have the belief that you can do it right and you can make a difference in people’s lives. As well as the ability to focus on what’s good in our lives and helping us good in your life as well as what’s good in our lives right and helping others do the same so they can create preserve our wealth and just live a more holistic great life. Thank you for being on the show for our listeners who want to get in touch with you which you might have one last time was the best place for them to find you

Jonathan:

Just go to Mindful.Money it’s not mindful money.com It’s Mindful.Money and you’ll find all the social links and all that kind of stuff right there you can send me a note in our in a little less subscribe to the newsletter and send you a note there that’s fine as well.

Brett:

Thanks, Jonathan DeYoe and I want to thank our listeners also for listening to that episode of the Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast by the way also stream on eXpertCRESecrets.com as well. If you’re checking us out there, where we believe most high net worth individuals and those who help them they struggle clarify their capital gains tax deferral options not having a clear plan is the enemy and using a proven tax deferral strategies such as the Deferred Sales Trust, even the CRT is a way to defer capital gains tax you can create and preserve more wealth than selling cryptocurrency business, real estate save a failed 1031 Exchange. If you want to learn more about the Deferred Sales Trust you can go to CapitalGainsTaxSolutions.com, It’s CapitalGainsTaxSolutions.com. Thanks so much for watching this please rate review, subscribe. We appreciate everyone out there.

 

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About Jonathan DeYoe

 

Unlocking Your Money Mindfulness with Jonathan DeYoeJonathan DeYoe has led an independent financial planning firm since 2002. He and the Mindful Money team work one on one with three hundred families and foundations. The Mindful Money team offers simple steps to financial success and tools to mindfully overcome emotional and cognitive biases related to money. He is passionate about spreading the values of goal-focused and planning-driven wealth management to help people enjoy better financial outcomes AND live happier lives!

His personal goal is to touch 1,000,000 lives in 10 years with Mindful Money financial education courses. He has been a California-based financial adviser for 25 years. He managed investments at a variety of Wall Street Companies before founding his own financial planning firm. He’s a contributor on personal finance matters for the Huffington Post, and Business Insider, among others and he has been featured in the Wall Street Journal and The New York Times.

 

 

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