Building Your CRE Wealth Formula with Buck Joffrey MD

Building Your CRE Wealth Formula with Buck Joffrey MD

Buck Joffrey, MD is a surgeon turned serial entrepreneur and the real estate professional with nearly one billion dollars in real estate transactions including $400 million commercial real estate current AUM. He is also the host of Wealth Formula Podcast

He started as a physician and was trained in neurosurgery and then plastics. He got into the edge of entrepreneurship after he read Robert Kiyosaki’s book called Cashflow Quadrant and started really looking at entrepreneurship and started that with his own practices, then branched out into other businesses. 

 

Watch the episode here:

 

Listen to the podcast here:

 

Building Your CRE Wealth Formula with Buck Joffrey MD

 

Brett:

I’m excited about our next guest. He’s in fact, probably one of my favorite podcasts to listen to. That’s to be real honest, he thinks on another level, and it helps make things that are a little bit complex, really simple, and also has a passion for helping others to achieve freedom through building wealth, and some areas that you might not have considered, and or ways to think about building wealth that you haven’t considered before. He’s on a mission to help others to do that every single day. Please welcome to the show with me, Dr. Buck Joffrey. Buck, how are you doing today?

Buck:

Good. How are you, Brett?

Brett:

Hey, better than I deserve. Glad to have you on the show. excited to dive right in. Because a lot of content covering this show today. So let’s just start first off with a little bit about your story, Buck. For those who didn’t know you for the first time and your current focus?

Buck:

Yeah, it’s a long story, right. But my background is, I’m a physician. I trained broadly, started out in neurosurgery had neck surgery, and then plastics. And then, kind of got the edge in entrepreneurship after reading a Robert Kiyosaki book called Cashflow Quadrant and started really looking at entrepreneurship and started that with my own practices branched out into other businesses. My investment interests were in real estate because that’s just sort of the way I grew up with my family’s multifamily investing. Well, my dad’s been doing that for 50 years. So the commercial real estate essentially started from our actual residential real estate started from my own investing in apartment buildings. And then ultimately discovering the power of real estate syndications, with a good operator, a sponsor, and then from there, realizing that,  I had the ability to, really contribute on that side of the coin as well. And so I ultimately ended up in the real estate, private equity, and mixed my interest in business with real estate, and then I think that’s been a good place for me. So that’s kind of my background. And now obviously, I have this real estate private equity and the operation. I’ve got probably about 2000 accredited investors in there, a lot of them are physicians, and,  a lot of them are dentists, people in healthcare, who kind of resonate with my story. But there are business people and,  a number of other,  broad groups of people and demographics that all have one thing in common, they tend to make more money than your average Joe.

Brett:

Excellent. Thanks for that brief part of your story. I want to take our listeners back one other step and perhaps before the medical practice days, and before the investment real estate days,  I believe we’ve all been given certain gifts, and perhaps these gifts are given to us to be a blessing to others. Some people call them strengths or superpowers, but I want you to go back and I want you to perhaps share with us what you believe those gifts that were given to you, and how do they help how you help people today?

Buck:

Yeah,  I think for me,  I don’t say this to act like I’m Mr. Modesty, but I don’t consider myself like, naturally the smartest guy in the room all the time. And I would, as a neurosurgery resident, I kind of did the top of the hierarchy. But I feel like the way I understood the reason I was able to achieve always is because my own way of learning things was to be able to break things down into very complex things into simpler pieces. And,  that has served me very, very well and even as in surgery,  being able to take the more complex procedures, break them down into any Individuals simple movements and sort of very stereotyped movements. And,  have things make sense to me, in my own mind, to master them has been really critical. Now, for me, actually, I think what has served my audience well, is the fact that,  listen, if, in order for you to explain something to others, you really have to understand it well. And I am kind of a straight shooter in the sense that I understand things in a very straightforward manner, I try to simplify them.  I always think about the way I bowl, if I ever go bowling, I don’t put any spin on it, to me, I just hit the aim for the front pan, and I knock it down. So the point is, that, I think that my listeners would tell you, and my investors would tell you that the thing that they find appealing about my style is the ability to sort of conveying fairly complex strategies and paradigms so that they’re pretty easy to understand.

Brett:

Yeah, making the complex simple. And I can absolutely agree with that as a listener for your podcast, Buck. And that is, as a gift,  and it may have come naturally to you for years. But man, every day I try I struggle with it, right? Because I’m sure it’s just,  slowing your mind down, slowing your emotions down, and then trying to put yourself in the other person’s shoes and saying, “why don’t we just get cut to the chase?”, and I like the analogy of bowling, right? I like to put that first and knock it down. Excellent. So let’s now dive right into how that helps you help others build wealth and or just commercial real estate investing? When you’re finding deals or looking at deals or looking at operators or underwriting property? What’s the best-kept secret to keeping it simple?

Buck:

Well, let me go back to the analogy, again, of what I felt like made me successful as a surgeon,  I did a handful of the same procedures over and over and over again, and I perfected them, I got really, really good at them, I could do them and,  half the time, a third of the time of the others and get better results. And to me, what became attractive is to try to put those kinds of concepts in place. So when I approach real estate, specifically,  my niches is what, generally apartment buildings and larger apartment buildings, 200 units plus, what I like about that space, and the way we approach it is the same way I approach surgery is to say, we’re not out there to reinvent the wheel, I would love to tell you that every little,  deal that we do is a work of art, but it’s not. And if it were, I think it would have a higher likelihood of failure. But we try to do is to make,  value add real estate, in the residential space. We try to make it like McDonald’s, right? We want everything the same. We want the coffee,  the day we acquire something, we’re not going to sit around and think about what color we want to paint the walls, we’re not going to think about which units we’re going to renovate how quickly that’s all been planned ahead of time. And I think what makes us unique in that regard, is that what we’re trying to do is,  we’re trying to do things well, but we’re doing it the same, and we’re trying to do it a lot quicker than everybody else. Now, why is that important? Because if you ever look at a pro forma, Brett and every pro forma show you like five years, and you know what you’re gonna do when the value at creation, the one variable that is probably ignored more than any other variable, by the operators and the investors alike, is the variable of time, right? So if you have a five-year pro forma, showing you that you’re going to double your money in five years, which is pretty typical, right? Getting 17 to 20% annualized return. I mean, that’s, that’s kind of your typical pro forma show. But what if you could do that and half the time? Well, then your returns just go way, way up. And that’s really what we’re focused on. We can change. We can create,  we can take advantage of what the market will give us to the extent that we know what value add we can bring. We know what the comps are, we know what you know how much money we can increase net operating income realistically over a period of time. But the one thing that we can control better than I think just about anybody I know out there is our ability to do it very, very quickly. And the faster we do something, the more money our investors make. And so I think that’s probably one of the most unique aspects of what we do.

Brett:

Excellent. So taking the surgery of the surgeon approach, and perfecting surgery and applying that to perfecting the value add an implementation of that business plan, have everything pre-planned, prepackaged McDonald’s, like, let’s just go right, let’s go quickly, instead of three to five years, let’s try to do it maybe into three things. Is that a fair summary?

Buck:

Yep, nature is.

Brett:

Excellent. So now let’s apply the concept of time to capital and on your website, I was reading one of your blogs, just the fact that in 2000,  the crash, the 2008 crash, there’s over $7 trillion lost in the stock market, right? Or perhaps even other places where people had overpaid for properties. I know, I was in California, Buck. And it was a time where Marcus and Millichap people were buying like crazy before the crash. And everything hit in Sacramento is one of the hardest-hit countries or cities in the country, and a crash and I saw friends, family clients lose half some lose everything, or paid. And they weren’t making time for their friend, they were overpaying, and or they had too much in the stock market. So just talk about the value of being able to diversify and have time beyond your side.

Buck:

Yeah, I mean, I don’t,  I would just say with regard to the crash and everything, I mean,  real estate is not independent of other asset classes, right? I mean, it’s still linked, we could,  I’m not going to pretend that we don’t have some, when, when economies are bad, that we have some kind of,  special power to stay away from the effects of that. But what we do have is, we do have some power over,  using some basic logic and understanding what,  to me, one of the things that I like about our space specifically, is we are in the business of rubes over your head. So if you go back to,  the basic fundamental needs that people have, they need to be eating. And, and,  you need to have some water and you need a roof over your head. Right. So that’s, that’s a fundamental thing that it’s always struck me is that’s where I want to be, I want to be where people still need to pay for,  the, they don’t need to be in office, they don’t need to be in retail, but they do need a roof over their head. Now. The other thing that generally speaking that philosophically has kept us in pretty good shape, even through COVID, pretty much unscathed is the fact that we’re not dealing in the space not really going after that glitzy a class property, we’re typically looking at B and C, class properties that are more for the working class. And I’m definitely not you’re not we’re D class properties, where you’re going to get yourself in trouble with poor credit and people,  not having jobs, but people who are,   service workers and blue-collar workers, etc, they need a place to live. We have had tremendous luck with that even though COVID.  our,  we have, we have had very little in the way of,  significant problems collecting rents. And part of that is also choosing the right markets, as well. I mean, I don’t  I live in California to Brett and I love it. I’d love to live in Montecito. But honestly, there’s no way I would invest here. There’s just no way. Right? Because I think the laws, the business friendliness of California are not there. I also think that there’s a fundamental difference in demographics as well.  I think,  in Texas, I feel like we hit a population that regardless of where they were at, they felt inclined to have to pay the rent. That was,  it’s part of their culture. I don’t know what it is, but we didn’t run into the problems of people not wanting to pay rent, or making it a political statement. So  Texas and, and Arizona,  we didn’t have a lot of issues there. So one last thing I’ll add is,  to the extent that if you look back in 2008, 2009 and the people who got hit the hardest there,  in residential real estate it sure the people who were investing in it In large complexes, and they mostly in the major markets like Dallas and Phoenix and things like that they survived just fine, the real people who got hit, they get hit harder speculators, right. That’s not what our business is, we’re not in the business of speculating, we’re not in the business of buy and hope. We’re in the business of buying and actually creating equity. In with commercial real estate, it’s quite simple, it’s Math, and it’s, again, goes back to a way it is that I like it,  it’s about driving up net operating income, you increase the number of rents that come in, and hopefully the skill that you have helped to decrease expenses. And that is the value of your property. And so the more you can do that, the quicker you can do that not only are you making your investors money, but you’re actually de-risking that property by by by middle,  side by lowering the leverage because you’ve increased value in the property.

Brett:

Yeah, 100%, so much wisdom there. And I want to dive into monitoring the Santa Barbara, and capital gains tax solutions as part of our podcast here. Part of what we do is the deferred sales trust, deferring taxes on the highly appreciated primary homes. So there’s a recent deal actually done in Montecito barely big here, look it up on Google, as well, as I did, I did one for a client of mine out of Palo Alto. And these folks that have been in these houses for 10, 15, 20 years bought it,  pretty low prices go through the roof, and they’re sitting on this pile of equity. And then the equation comes in, I think, a part of the wealth form that he considers is the return on equity. Right, especially in a primary home, where it’s not cash flowing. According to Robert Kiyosaki,  your primary home is not an investment, it’s a liability. It’s not paying your producing, giving you back money in order to have more time and energy or the ability to give more right or, or help someone else in a different need different cause. So let’s walk through the big challenge facing a lot of high-end primary homeowners, as you see it in Santa Barbara,  in the La Jolla was in the Silicon Valley’s and what your thoughts are on that?

Buck:

Yeah,  it’s interesting. This is something of a challenge I think a lot of people have. Because when it comes to commercial real estate, that’s personal, that most people don’t know how they don’t know that they have any options, right. I mean, we, I think people in real estate know about, have known about 1031 exchanges, like like, exchanges and that kind of thing. But I think very few people in the general public, probably know that they have some ability to mitigate their taxes on a personal residence. So this is actually in my opinion, is a really huge opportunity. And as you mentioned,  I live in Montecito. And despite the fact that I don’t want to do any business in California, I love living here, and a lot of people do. And there’s a lot of people with,  homes that have appreciated millions of dollars in the last decade. And especially right now,  I don’t know how it is where you are, Brett, but I mean, houses are going for millions of dollars over where there would have pre-COVID even because we’ve got so many people moving in from LA and San Francisco, etc. So it’s a tremendous opportunity for people to,  pick up some of that equity. And I think some people probably are not selling because they’re like, Okay, well, I mean,  I’m gonna hit a huge tax bill, and I don’t know what I’m going to do with this money. And in California, in particular, again, our, long-term capital gains are still problematic, because we still play pay significant state taxes on that, as well. So it’s not like doing long-term capital gains in North Dakota or something like that. 

Brett:

So yeah, 100%. It’s 20% Federal, right? 13.3 for the State, and so 33% and so the key is, how do you defer that and how do you perhaps make income on that unique part of the deferred sales trust as you can now sell high, and that’s the goal, right? And then you can diversify and put it into multifamily investments passively, or actively put it into the stock market, you can put it into hard money lending and essentially capture that value. And you start producing cash flow from that. And I think it’s part of redefining wealth as you say, as the freedom to do what you want with your life, right versus perhaps feeling stuck in that big house,  I’m able to leave towards the grandkids or, or to get more passive wealth coming in or just to diversify.  I have some clients, but they’re just,  they don’t really know what I just don’t want to go to a potential another crash or even just, I want to just do something else. I want to go start a new business venture. So it’s taking that wealth and transferring it, so talk to me about redefining wealth as the freedom to do what you want with your life.

Buck:

Yeah, I mean, I think that that’s fundamentally what we’re all trying to achieve, right? I mean, and you know what we’re going after the money so that we can do whatever we want with our life. But,  I think,  for me, a lot of people just to be clear, I mean, I think that there’s this, I was influenced by Robert Kiyosaki as well. And there’s this initial impact, or there’s this initial thing that everybody gets where, when you read Kiyosaki start thinking about cash flow, and how you’re going to be able to cash flow yourself into “retirement”, sometimes it does take a few rounds of equity growth, right. And so,  if you have somebody in physicians, for example, we have,  a lot of people making a half-million dollars a year, well, if they even found something that was cash flowing 10%, which is very difficult to do, right off the bat these days,  they’d need to have $5 million in investments going. So sometimes what we’re trying to do in our group with our investor group is we’re really focusing on equity growth so that we can take a principal amount, and double it, triple it over the course of the next,  five to seven years, hopefully, and then start implementing more of a cash flow play there. So there are different ways to do this. But I think at the end of the day, just having that money move fairly quickly, is really important. I think what you alluded to, with Robert Kiyosaki calling happier house liability. It’s, yeah, I mean, if you have a mortgage, particularly,  it’s a liability. But even if you don’t, you just have a bunch of debt-equity there, right. So you’re not really doing anything with it. And what we’re really all about is the velocity we want to create, we want to create growth in your money. And if it’s just sitting in a house in equity, it’s not really growing very fast. I mean, granted, if you’re in Montecito, it’s probably growing pretty fast right now. But it’s it’ll grow faster somewhere else with a little bit of leverage. 

Brett:

Yeah, 100% right. Time to sell, time to buy, time to diversify. Time to relocate your capital. I think it was Tesla, HP, and Oracle pass on 150 days mall decided to move to Austin, Texas. It is absolutely on fire as well for growth. And it has been for a few years already. It’s not anything new, but it just keeps going. And so I think it’s Wayne Gretzky, Gretzky says it well, but you want to skate to where the puck is going to be. Right. So, how are you skating right now? Where do you feel are the most opportunity for real estate investing?

Buck:

 I think that we’re coming off a COVID here. And as you know the Pet Podcast Ecosystem, a lot of people really had really predicted a lot of doom and gloom. And,  even some very, some people I respect a lot had really,  even until like a month ago, I had pretty much resigned to the zombie apocalypse. And, and sure enough, it didn’t happen. I admit it when this first happened, I was worried about it, too. But it became pretty clear in our own portfolio, that it was really, really resistant to what was happening. Now, here’s the thing that is going on in the big picture, that that I that makes me happy that we were doing what we’re doing. What did get crashed during COVID is pretty much most other sectors of real estate. So office retail, all these hotels, they all got crashed. Now, hotels will probably come back. I mean,  but you look at something like an office, and everybody’s used to working on zoom now, is that predict some sort of long term change in, the behavior of people in companies, it’s certainly cheaper to have people work at home. The same thing with retail mean, and people aren’t having gone to two stores much in a year, right there. And if Amazon didn’t already have a monopoly on everything, well, they do now and people’s habits have changed. So I think what we’re seeing is that big,  institutional money, and that was previously in the space of retail or office and stuff. They’re all shifting, and they’re all trying to get into the residential multifamily game because they’ve seen how resilient our market is. Now the good thing is for us, is that we’re going to keep doing what we do and the good thing is that we know how to do this because in every kind of real different real estate niche. I mean, it’s there’s a learning curve to this. So we’re ahead of the game here. They’re making it hard sometimes because they’re throwing stupid money at deals, but we still have the off-market, we still have the relationships within multifamily, and we can recognize a good deal. And we’re also looking at the ugly deals, right, they’re not going to want the ugly deals, because we know how to make them better. So at the end of the day, I think,  where is the puck going? Again, I’m happy to say that in the next six, seven years, I still see tremendous growth in multifamily as an investment. 

Brett:

I absolutely couldn’t agree with you more. I also really love senior housing assisted care facilities. I love independent storage to self-storage is great. Actually, yeah, I’ve been learning more about that one as well. And mobile home parks too, value add anything that can be kind of value add or growth, or it’s,  really landlord friendly markets. What are the biggest obstacles you see, for high net worth individuals as it pertains to the capital gains tax? And in the know, if you studied some of the potential Biden tax law changes, right, taking it from 20% federal to 39.7, you’re basically doubling it. Yeah. And so walk us through just your thoughts on that and also cryptocurrency? I’m curious what you think about that?

Buck:

Yeah. So in terms of the Biden stuff,  I remember, it’s a 50-50 Congress right now. And there are a couple of pretty conservative Democrats. So, do I think that capital gains are going to, for the most part, be eliminated? I actually don’t, I think that would be very, very difficult.  I just don’t think that that’s something that those conservative democrats would go for. So here’s the thing is that in my, what we talk about all the time, is we can’t necessarily control what,  what the new legislation is going to be. But what we’re trying to do is,  make our investments continue to grow. Investors and business owners tend to have opportunities, regardless of who the administration is, right? So,  yes, the Biden administration is probably going to figure out how to raise some taxes somewhere. But at the end of the day, investors and business owners are probably going to be just fine. Probably not going to hit too hard. Because net, they’ll probably be some opportunities for us. I mean, even if, even if you’re talking about this,  green New Deal concept or something like that, that can’t happen without substantial opportunities for us in the sense that,  what is the tax code? My,  my CPA, my friend, Tom wheelwright always just says that the tax code is just a series of incentives, right? Unless you’re a W-2 wage earner, which, unfortunately, most of my investors are,  you have a lot of opportunities to mitigate your taxes by doing an investing in the things that government wants you to do. So, if you are,  what we advocate for,  in our community is really trying to change your facts and increase your presence in that investor quadrant is as Robert Kiyosaki would say, if you’re not a business owner, at least try to really really rev up that investor quadrant. And by the way, I mean, if you’re sitting on a huge amount of equity in your home, taking that into your personal taking it from your personal account, debt-equity and pushing that into an investor quadrant would be a huge way of sort of no jumpstarting that entire existence.

Brett:

Yeah, 100%. Debt equity into an investor quadrant. You’re a business owner quadrant, right. On the right side of that makes a whole lot of sense. So now let’s dive into cryptocurrency. Briefly. Curious, your thoughts on that. Are you personally investing in crypto at all for yourself? What do you think of it?

 

Building Your CRE Wealth Formula with Buck Joffrey MD

Building Your CRE Wealth Formula: “Price is what you pay. Value is what you get.” – Warren Buffet

 

Buck:

Well, I never really think of cryptocurrency as an investment outside of Bitcoin. Bitcoin to me is,  I think it’s real. I think it’s digital gold. I think even though it’s volatile right now, when that  $1 trillion market cap goes up to  $10 trillion, I don’t think it’s nearly evolved as volatile anymore. I think bitcoins here to stay. I actually recently want to have that with somebody about,  Bitcoin going to 50,000. And I’m, I got a Bitcoin from this person at 50,000 If you want,  I think Bitcoin will probably hit 250,000 in the next five years sometimes. I think it’s institutional and institutional investors and pension funds and all that are all going to start getting interested in this and it only takes a really, really small allocation like less than 1% or half percent 20 basis points, whatever, and but by these huge funds, and before you know it, that’s how you get to $250,000 Bitcoin. Now, as far as the rest of cryptocurrency goes, I do own it. Yeah, I own Bitcoin. And I also own a fair amount of alternatives. But to me, those are all sort of, so I’m long Bitcoin. But with everything else I’m looking at it is very much a speculative play.  I think that probably 99% of adults will be gone in the next five years. But there in the short term, there’s some opportunity to make some money. So I wouldn’t really call that investing, though, right? I mean, I think it’s more it’s more of a gamble. Honestly, you’re just sort of timing speculation on this stuff. Some of those projects will turn out great, but I mean, there’s no rhyme or reason for the prices on these things. So if you want to, I have some favorite projects, I put some money into them. And I kind of look at that as my asymmetric bucket if it 10 axes, I’m great. If I lose it, then  Oh, well.

Brett:

I’m 100% with you. I appreciate you sharing them and by the way, we’re working on a $9 million deferred sales trust crypto case right now for that exact reason that you can now defer taxes using the for sale trust for crypto and it’s putting in the right order get everything set up prior to I think I’m like going any of my crypto friends or people who know who haven’t like hey, now’s a great time to sell it’s gone back up, right? Get out diversify, go into investment real estate, right capture that,  because this last year, the last downturn took a little while to get back. Yeah, that’s just something that we’re really trying to help so anyone who wants to learn about that, go to capitalgainstaxsolutions.com and look up and schedule a free time. That being said, Buck, are you ready for the lightning round?

Buck:

Right? Yeah, I guess so.

Brett:

Alright, so knowing what you know, if you go back to your 25-year-old self, what’s the one Golden Nugget you’d make sure you would tell yourself to do?

Buck:

I would probably,  share my thoughts on entrepreneurship sooner rather than later because I had no idea that entrepreneurship or investing. I didn’t know anything about it, but I would probably share that information with myself.

Brett:

Yeah, like that said earlier, after building your net worth and helping others countless do the same. What’s the single best practice to implement to be successful? 

Buck:

I think giving back. Just being able to help your peers and giving back to your own community.

Brett:

Love it. Best real estate investment ever?

Buck:

We’re averaging a 30% annualized return for our investors in our syndications. But some of the early apartment buildings that I bought, right after residency was getting a 5 to 600% return because of appreciation in the right markets. But that was dumb luck.

Building Your CRE Wealth Formula with Buck Joffrey MD

Brett:

Yeah, sure. Sometimes it works in your favor, right? Yeah. One book you’ve recommended or gifted the most in?

Buck:

The past year, Cashflow Quadrant, Robert Kiyosaki.

 

 

Brett:

I’m actually really listened to that on the audible moon. I highly recommend that as well. Favorite leadership quote or theme that you strive to live by?

Buck:

From what I do, in the history of the world, no one has ever taken a rental car to the carwash and believe that was Lawrence Summers, former Harvard President and also he was a Treasury Guy under Obama.

Brett:

And what does that mean, Buck? I’m not even sure I’m following but I know there’s something there.

Buck:

Well, it’s about ownership. Right? It’s about owning things instead of renting them, and also, it’s also about being a business owner as opposed to being an employee or even how to structure your employees. If if you are a business owner. Basically, if you don’t have any ownership, you don’t care enough about what’s going to happen. So you rent a car. I mean, why would you take it to the carwash? Right? But you own that car, you’re going to take care of it.

Brett:

Beautiful. Love it. Thanks for bringing that home for me. What are you curious about right now?

Buck:

I’m curious what’s going to happen with my alternative coins and crypto

Brett:

Deferred sales trust.

Buck:

I was going to contact you. And then there was a big reversal recently. So we’ll see how that goes.

Brett:

By the way, the earlier the better, and we don’t charge until you close. So all right. Last question, Buck. After all your success and helping others to have tons of success, I think the Wealth Formula Podcast, and all the investments you’re doing and of course, your career in the medical field. How do you stay centered in your values and how do you stay encouraged to charge forward to reach for new heights?

Buck:

Yeah, I mean, as far as being centered, you don’t have to, for me, at least you don’t have to go further than my children.  I have three little girls 11, 8, and 3, and they’ll keep me centered pretty easily. What was the second part of the question?

Brett:

How do you stay encouraged to charge forward to reach new heights after you’ve accomplished so much?

Buck:

Well, for me personally, here’s that one thing I discovered after reading the Cashflow Quadrant, was that I am an entrepreneur at my core. So entrepreneurs who are like me at least that, they see this as making money is just keeping score, right? That’s all it is. And so what we’re constantly striving to do is to do things better to be innovative and create it’s a way of, it’s our way of being,  creative.  I’m not an artist, but in a way, this is my art is by creating and making things more efficient and finding ways to do better. And the way we keep score is by making money. 

Brett:

Beautiful. I really resonate with that. I appreciate that. But I want to thank you for being on the show. I want to thank you for sharing so much wisdom with us and a part of your story. For those who want to get in touch with you, Buck, what’s the best place for them to find you?

Buck:

Yeah, I think if you’re into podcasts, Wealth Formula Podcast, so we’re all over the place, iTunes, Stitcher, or YouTube. We don’t do this restream thing that you’re doing yet, but maybe that’s something we had to do. Yep, we’re all over the place, wealthformula.com if you want to check out what we’re doing

Brett:

Beautiful and for our listeners, I want to encourage you if you need or want to potentially defer capital gains tax on the sale of a primary home, business investment, and real estate, go to capitalgainstaxsolutions.com and get your free consultation. Download our FREE eBook, escape feeling trapped by capital gains tax. And with that, I want to thank you for listening to another episode of the Capital Gains Tax Solutions Podcast as always, we believe most high net worth individuals and those who help them you know they struggle with clarifying their options not having a clear plan is the enemy and using a proven tax referral strategy or connecting with someone like on the deferred sales trust or connecting with someone like Buck Joffrey and investing in multifamily value value add syndications is a great or the best way to grow your wealth. With that, please Rate, Review, Subscribe. We appreciate your listening and being a part of the Capital Gains Tax solutions Solution. Take care, everybody. Bye.

 

Important Links:

 

About Buck Joffrey, MD

Building Your CRE Wealth Formula with Buck Joffrey MD

Buck Joffrey, MD is a Podcaster, best-selling financial author, real asset investor, and board-certified surgeon.

Buck Joffrey, MD is a surgeon turned serial entrepreneur and the real estate professional with nearly one billion dollars in real estate transactions including $400 million commercial real estate current AUM. He is also the host of Wealth Formula Podcast

He started as a physician and was trained in neurosurgery and then plastics. He got into the edge of entrepreneurship after he read Robert Kiyosaki’s book called Cashflow Quadrant and started really looking at entrepreneurship and started that with his own practices, then branched out into other businesses.

 

 

Love the show? Subscribe, rate, review, and share!
Join the Capital Gains Tax Solutions Community today:

By Brett

Related Articles

Raising Millions in Capital in 30 days with Bryan Ellis

Raising Millions in Capital in 30 days with Bryan Ellis

Bryan Ellis is the host of Self Directed Investor Talk, a very popular podcast and radio show. Bryan has a vast background in real estate investing and currently serves as a manager of a real estate-focused private equity fund operating in Northern California.  Bryan...

read more
Autonomous Security Robots with William Santana Li

Autonomous Security Robots with William Santana Li

William ("Bill") Santana Li is the Founder of Knightscope. He and his partner, have formed a company in response to the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook and Boston Bombings. He has a passion, for creating an affordable platform to reduce both crime and economic burden...

read more

0 Comments

Learn Our 9.Step Framework

"How To Sell Your Real Estate Or Business Or Any Highly Appreciated Assets Smarter"

Check your email for the Deferred Sales Trust Guide

Secured By miniOrange